society

2505, 2017

Can this beloved 80 year old ever be stopped from killing people?

By |May 25th, 2017|In The News, Opinion|0 Comments

Head of Psychology at Birmingham City University, Professor Craig Jackson, joins in the celebrations of the 80th Birthday of the Golden Gate Bridge, one of the most iconic and symbolic engineering achievements in the United States. He asks if current measures proposed to tackle the bridge’s darker reputation as a suicide hotspot will do enough […]

205, 2017

The tip of an iceberg: Madeleine McCann and the shameful realities of missing children

By |May 2nd, 2017|In The News, Opinion|Comments Off on The tip of an iceberg: Madeleine McCann and the shameful realities of missing children

by Dr Elizabeth Yardley, Director of the Centre for Applied Criminology at Birmingham City University

Ten years ago, three-year-old Madeleine McCann disappeared from a holiday apartment in the Portuguese resort of Praia da Luz. Though physically absent, she became a permanent presence in mainstream media and public consciousness. Both visible and invisible, seen and unseen, clear and blurred.

She […]

111, 2016

How society has created groups that are vulnerable to serial murder

By |November 1st, 2016|In The News, Opinion|Comments Off on How society has created groups that are vulnerable to serial murder

by Dr Adam Lynes, criminologist at Birmingham City University

Stephen Port, forty-one and a chef from East London, is currently on trial for the murder of four men who were found dumped within 400 metres of Port’s home in Cooke Street over a 15-month period. In particular, Port is accused of luring the four young men […]

1710, 2016

‘The Circus of Horrors’ – A Criminologist’s thoughts on the “Killer Clown Epidemic”

By |October 17th, 2016|In The News, Opinion|Comments Off on ‘The Circus of Horrors’ – A Criminologist’s thoughts on the “Killer Clown Epidemic”

by Dr Adam Lynes, lecturer in Criminology at Birmingham City University

The 2016 clown sightings, which have commonly been referred to by names such as “panic”, “uprising”, “epidemic”, and “invasion” , are a series of “evil” or “killer” clown sightings reported in the United States and to a lesser extent other Western countries since August 2016.

This […]

2502, 2016

In an age of constant social media communication, are sports stadiums losing relevance?

By |February 25th, 2016|In The News, Opinion|Comments Off on In an age of constant social media communication, are sports stadiums losing relevance?

Dr Steve McCabe, Birmingham City Business School

For someone who grew up in Hall Green, Birmingham in the 1970s it is fascinating to look at the pictures taken of the area when it was being transformed in the 1920s from a small collection of house in the countryside on the outskirts of Birmingham to the suburb […]

611, 2015

Social psychologist applauds John Lewis Christmas ad

By |November 6th, 2015|In The News, Opinion|Comments Off on Social psychologist applauds John Lewis Christmas ad

(Image courtesy of John Lewis)
Dr Elle Boag, senior lecturer in Social Psychology at Birmingham City University.

So, this morning saw the release of the John Lewis Christmas advert and once again social media is alive with people’s emotional responses to it.

Comments such as “…emosh or what?” and “Thanks John Lewis for making me cry first thing […]

1106, 2015

Jordskott – Beyond ‘labs and slabs’: What fuels our appetite for serialised crime drama?

By |June 11th, 2015|In The News, Opinion|Comments Off on Jordskott – Beyond ‘labs and slabs’: What fuels our appetite for serialised crime drama?

Dr Elizabeth Yardley, Reader in Criminology at Birmingham City University

Last night I watched the first episode of Jordskott on ITV Encore with interest. The 10 part series is the latest incarnation of Nordic Noir, following the considerable success of its predecessors which include Wallander, The Killing and The Bridge. Lengthy serialised crime dramas have become […]

106, 2015

Five years on from the Cumbrian mass shooting – what more do we know about such killers?

By |June 1st, 2015|In The News, Opinion|Comments Off on Five years on from the Cumbrian mass shooting – what more do we know about such killers?

Professor  Craig Jackson reflects on the Cumbrian Shooting tragedy in 2010. He suggests that mass shootings committed by single perpetrators against strangers are still increasing in frequency, but that the psycholopathogy of such perpetrators is slowly being understood more fully. Depression and suicidal tendencies are not predictors of mass shooters – but personality flaws may […]

1405, 2015

As McDonald’s turns 75 – do you know how it all began?

By |May 14th, 2015|In The News|Comments Off on As McDonald’s turns 75 – do you know how it all began?

Dr Steve McCabe, Birmingham City Business School

The car manufacturer Henry Ford is the name most associated with having allowed the vision of scientific management come to life through his adoption of message contained in Frederick W. Taylor’s 1911 book Principles of Scientific Management.  

Ford’s ability to utilise what we now call mass production was revolutionary […]

2603, 2015

Boy Band Breakups: Let’s not be so cavalier to the “Directioners”

By |March 26th, 2015|In The News, Opinion|Comments Off on Boy Band Breakups: Let’s not be so cavalier to the “Directioners”

Professor Craig Jackson, Head of Psychology at Birmingham City University

In February 1996 when Take That announced their split, press reports were feverish about the prospect of fans, distraught at the news of the band’s demise, threatening to commit suicide, and being mournful. While we may look back on this with some joyful glee, it might […]