education

1004, 2013

Why are our schools allowed to hire ‘unqualified teachers?’

By |April 10th, 2013|Opinion|2 Comments

By Lynn Fulford – Associate Dean of Faculty of Education, Law and Social Sciences

In late 2010 the Coalition Government set out its plans for education in the White Paper, The Importance of Teaching. In it Michael Gove, Secretary of State for Education, appeared to speak passionately about his commitment to teaching as a profession,

“At the heart […]

3003, 2013

Why are our primary schools missing language targets?

By |March 30th, 2013|Opinion|2 Comments

By Lynn Fulford – Associate Dean of Faculty of Education, Law and Social Sciences

The Education Secretary, Michael Gove, has embarked on a consultation on the Government’s plan to introduce foreign languages into the primary curriculum at the start of Key Stage 2, when children are seven years old.  Disappointing then that a recent report by […]

2703, 2013

Teachers aren’t ‘truanting’ if they spend less time in the classroom

By |March 27th, 2013|Opinion|Comments Off on Teachers aren’t ‘truanting’ if they spend less time in the classroom

By Alex Kendall – Associate Dean of Faculty of Education, Law and Social Sciences

It is not unusual to hear students ask, when faced with a piece of writing, ‘how many words?’ or ‘how many references?’ my well-rehearsed response to those sorts of questions is that thoughtful engagement with the field of study is much more […]

2603, 2013

Behaviour and mental health issues in schools

By |March 26th, 2013|Opinion|Comments Off on Behaviour and mental health issues in schools

By Lynn Fulford – Associate Dean of Faculty of Education, Law and Social Sciences 

The Association of Teachers and Lecturers reports that there have been sharp rises in disruptive behaviour in our schools over recent years.  It is interesting that most of the disruptive behaviour is considered to be fairly low level, with 79% of staff […]

2401, 2013

Can we have a ‘proper’ consultation for A-level reforms?

By |January 24th, 2013|Opinion|Comments Off on Can we have a ‘proper’ consultation for A-level reforms?

By Professor Fiona Church, Executive Dean of the Faculty of Education, Law and Social Sciences

The changes to the structure of A and AS level exams by the Secretary of State for Education, whilst not surprising to education professionals, were not welcomed. The notion that two years of study in a more limited range of subjects, […]

901, 2013

Teenagers to be encouraged to learn classic poetic works

By |January 9th, 2013|Opinion|2 Comments

Professor David Roberts, Acting Executive Dean of the Faculty of Performance, Media and English at Birmingham City University, shares his views on Government’s new plans to improve the understanding of poetry in schools and how great possessing the magical intricacy of a poem can be.

Our heads are full of off-cuts, shards of language splintered from […]

412, 2012

A-level overhaul: the right decision?

By |December 4th, 2012|Opinion|Comments Off on A-level overhaul: the right decision?

By Professor Martin Fautley, Director of Birmingham City University’s Centre for Research in Education

The potential shake up of the A-level system, as reported in The Times, has caused some waves in the education sector recently as leaders and policy makers begin to make sense of the coalition’s latest proposal.

The reports suggest that the current A-level […]

2111, 2012

Will the CBI report be an end to the current patchwork-reform system?

By |November 21st, 2012|Opinion|Comments Off on Will the CBI report be an end to the current patchwork-reform system?

By Professor Fiona Church, Executive Dean, Faculty of Education, Law and Social Sciences

The CBI ‘First Steps Report’ calls for a more holistic approach to reform in education – wholesale review rather than the confusing patchwork of reforms schools have had to deal with over the past few years.

The CBI are critical of  the current system […]

2109, 2012

How do you prepare teachers for 21st century students?

By |September 21st, 2012|Opinion|Comments Off on How do you prepare teachers for 21st century students?

Senior Lecturer Louise Wheatcroft of the University’s School of Education says that policy makers should be looking to make more of an effort to recognise the importance of preparing teachers for the next generation of students: one that is both digitally literate and net-savvy.

Louise explained: “What we are beginning to see now is a gap […]

1909, 2012

Five ways assessments in schools need to change

By |September 19th, 2012|Opinion|Comments Off on Five ways assessments in schools need to change

Research by Birmingham City University is leading a debate on education policy after being covered by the Independent, Telegraph and BBC.

The study, by Professor Martin Fautley of the University’s School of Education, found that some school teachers feel under pressure to change pupil’s marks in order to make academic progress seem more obvious. The research […]