Two Exchange Collaborative Projects awarded to researchers

The round two recipients of The Culture Capital Exchange’s Collaborative Research Awards have been announced, and there are two winners from Birmingham City University.

Jacqueline Taylor and Jacob Salder have each won funding of £5000 to pursue a research project in collaboration with industry partners.

If you are interesting in applying for Round 3 visit the Exchange Website.

Project details

Project name: Rearrangements

Director: Caroline Horton

Academic partner: Dr Jacqueline Taylor, Birmingham City University

Caroline Horton is a theatre maker, writer and performer, an associate at Birmingham Rep and BBC Birmingham Writer in Residence.

Caroline’s research partner is Dr Jacqueline Taylor, Birmingham City University, whose research critically examines relations between visual art, poetics and philosophy with a particular focus on the textual concept and practice of l’écriture féminine.

Their collaborative research project ‘is a critical, practical and creative interrogation of narrative, form and structure and how this affects meaning-making when encountering/interpreting artistic practice. ‘Rearrangements’ opens up a site of exchange between Caroline’s expertise as a theatre-maker who experiments with form in her work and Jacqueline’s academic specialism of l’écriture féminine, which proposes alternative linguistic structures, narratives and forms to create ‘other’ languages.

Project name: The creative business – enhancing business practices in arts-based creative industries

Director: Antonia Beck

Academic Partner: Jacob Salder, Birmingham City University

Antonia Beck is an independent artist and creative producer specialising in performance-based work that spans theatre, live literature, outdoor arts, live art and other interdisciplinary performance practices.

Antonia’s research partner, Jacob Salder, Birmingham City University, is an economic geographer and economic development specialist through qualification and experience. He has spent a number of years researching different sectors, including the Creative Industries, in various Economic Development roles for local and regional government.

Their collaborative research project ‘The Creative Business – Enhancing business practice in the arts-based creative industries’ will look at business practice in this sector, focusing on arts / performance-based creative industries (ABCIs) and examine this against orthodox understandings. They will consider how applicable these understandings are to ABCIs and how they can be refined to support business development in this sector. The project will produce key outputs in the shape of intensive guidance for a set of ABCIs alongside creating an analysis and support framework specific to this sub-sector, enabling creatives to develop their businesses.

Full STEAM Ahead? The Creative Economy and Higher Education – 13 July

Parkside lecture theatre, 7pm-9pm, Wednesday 13 July. Drinks at 6.30pm

Register on Eventbrite

Supported by Creative Advantage Fund and Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research

Full STEAM Ahead?  The Creative Economy and Higher Education

What are relations like between the creative economy and universities in the Midlands? What expectations do businesses, creatives, educators and students have of each other for innovation, work and reward in exchanges between them and their collaborations? What are the opportunities or impediments for exchange and for sustaining and growing the creative sector?

This symposium brings together a range of individuals representing experience in the creative sector and HE to discuss some of these questions in light of current issues and challenges for the economy, society and culture of the Midlands.

Discussants include: Thomas Dillon (CAF); Professor David Roberts (Pro Vice Chancellor Executive Dean of Art, Design and Media); Rebbecca Hemmings (Strawberry Words); Suriya Roberts-Grey (cultural entrepreneur); Matt Davidson (CAF Prizewinner); Amahra Spence (founder of MAIA Creatives). Chair: Professor Paul Long, BCMCR.

This event is supported by the Creative Advantage Fund (CAF).

The founding of CAF in 2000 was the first step in the UK’s experiment with venture capital as a funding mechanism for cultural production, reflecting a new approach in government to what became known as the “creative industries”, defined as “those industries which have their origin in individual creativity, skill and talent and which have a potential for wealth and job creation through the generation and exploitation of intellectual property” (DCMS, 1998). Despite success stories, the conditions under which policy goals can be achieved through the interaction of cultural practitioners and commercially-oriented finance remain uncertain.

The event will also see the announcement of the winner of the 2016 CAF-BCU Prize. 

The CAF-BCU Prize of £500 is awarded for the best dissertation on the creative industries submitted for degree purposes by a student at BCU.

All welcome. Register on Eventbrite.

Conservatoire researcher’s grant win featured in Times Higher

Professor Deborah Mawer of Birmingham Conservatoire has been featured in the Grant Winners section of the Times Higher Education for her successful bid for an Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) grant.

The grant, worth £461,583, is to lead a three-year project: ‘Accenting the Classics: Durand’s Édition classique (c. 1915-25) as a French Prism on the Musical Past’, in collaboration with Graham Sadler (Birmingham Conservatoire), Barbara L. Kelly (Royal Northern College of Music) and Rachel Moore (University of Oxford). This project will blend analytical, cultural and historical musicology with music performance to investigate the nature of the varying ‘French accent’ (Ravel’s ‘accent singulier’) given to earlier European piano music (the ‘Classics’) within Durand’s multi-volume edition, on the occasion of its centenary. The repertoire comprises music by well-known and since-forgotten composers, which was edited by well- and lesser-known early twentieth-century French composers, together with musicologists and teachers at the Paris Conservatoire.

Investigation will start with detailed analytical case studies of edited music. An initial group will include Ravel (editing Mendelssohn) and Debussy (Chopin); Emmanuel, Garban and Roger-Ducasse (Bach and Burgundian folksongs); balanced by music of the eighteenth-century French harpsichordists, including Couperin (edited by Tiersot) and Rameau (Diémer). Secondly, using blended archival, historical and interpretative skills, assessment of the role and wider cultural network of the Édition classique will offer new insights into early twentieth-century French cultural identity (for example, incipient neoclassicism); relations with twentieth-century French composers’ own music; canonic issues; Conservatoire pedagogy; wartime publishing, in the context of editions by Henry Expert, Saint-Saëns and Heugel. The project will also embrace how today’s users – students, scholars, musicians and the wider public – can benefit from (test out and inflect) this knowledge, including alternative interpretations for pianists and the promotion of ‘lost’ repertoire. ‘Accenting the Classics’ will run from summer 2016-2019.

BCU Network for Research on Gender – 19 May

Thursday 19 May, 3pm-5pm, C003 (Curzon Building)

The first seminar by the BCU Network for Research on Gender features a paper by Dr Annette Naudin and Karen Patel, both from the Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research. Their paper is titled: 

Entangled expertise: Women’s use of social media in entrepreneurial work.

If you wish to attend, please register here.

Abstract

This paper addresses issues of identity and professionalism for female cultural entrepreneurs by drawing on the online activities of a small group of women. We investigate the construction of professional identities as expressed through social media activities, in this case, we focus on twitter as a key platform for cultural workers. Our key question is: How do women cultural entrepreneurs use online platforms to perform expertise? We draw on contemporary feminist debates (Gill, 2002, 2007; McRobbie, 2004, 2015) to evaluate the presentation of women’s expertise in public spaces such as Twitter. Social media platforms are important to self-employed cultural workers as a means of reaching markets and promoting the entrepreneur’s brand identity, but beyond self-enhancement, how are notions of expertise negotiated by individual cultural entrepreneurs and how does this relate to gender and work? Given the well documented gender and ethnic inequalities in cultural and creative industry work (Oakley, 2014; Gill, 2002), what does the social media content generated by individual women tell us about the nature of professional female identities within neoliberal economies?

Speaker bios

Dr Annette Naudin

Annette Naudin is senior lecturer in media and cultural entrepreneurship and is an Enterprise Education fellow of the National Centre for Graduate Entrepreneurship. She has run creative enterprise conferences, published and presented on the subject. Annette is a member of the Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research. Annette completed her PhD (2015) at the Centre for Cultural Policy Studies, at the University of Warwick, exploring the cultural and media worker’s experience of entrepreneurship.

Karen Patel

Karen Patel is a second year postgraduate researcher in the Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research. Her PhD is funded by the AHRC Midlands 3 Cities scheme and her supervisors are Professor Paul Long (BCU) and Professor Mark Banks (Leicester). For her PhD she is looking at the social media use of artists, particularly how artists perform expertise on social media, and the role of social media in cultural labour.

BCU researcher to reveal secrets of songwriting in BBC World Service documentary

On Saturday May 7th, Dr Simon Barber, a research fellow in the School of Media, will present an hour-long BBC World Service radio documentary called The Secrets of Songwriting along with his colleague Brian O’Connor. Together, the pair make up the Liverpool-based songwriting team Sodajerker.

Dr Simon Barber (left) and

Dr Simon Barber (left) and Brian O’Connor

The BBC programme derives from the duo’s hugely popular podcast, Sodajerker On Songwriting, featuring some of the world’s most renowned songwriters talking about their working processes and sharing the stories behind their biggest hits.

The show will include contributions from a range of guests heard on the Sodajerker podcast such as Motown legend Lamont Dozier, Brill Building-era hitmakers Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, Andy Partridge of XTC and singer-songwriter Joan Armatrading.

Dr Simon Barber said, “We were thrilled when the BBC approached us to create this programme. The documentary is a fantastic opportunity for us to share our insights into songwriting with their worldwide audience.”

The Secrets of Songwriting is scheduled for broadcast in most parts of the world via digital radio on Saturday May 7, 2016 at 13.06 (14.06 in the UK because of daylight saving) and streaming online via the BBC website. It will also be made available thereafter as a BBC World Service podcast.

Conferences calls for papers

There are two calls for papers at the moment for upcoming internal conferences; all research staff and students from all faculties are welcome to submit if it fits with your research.

The abstract deadline for both is Friday 20th May 2016.

Research Matter(s), conversations about research in art, design and media, 8 July 2016

Research Matters poster

Research matters(s) offers a forum for you to playfully and critically communicate/articulate/present/re-present your research through/as matter. It aims to enable the making, creating and becoming that is part of research process.

Download the full call for papers (PDF)

Please email proposals to admpgr-studio@bcu.ac.uk by Friday 20th May 2016.

CSPACE/CELT conference: Research, Teaching and Learning in Education across Birmingham City University: Pedagogy, Practice, Politics and Policy: Where to next in teaching, learning and research in education? 11th July 2016

Proposals are invited for lightning talks, posters, presentations and workshops on researching education, education policy, pedagogies and professional practices in teaching.

Download the full call for papers (PDF)

Please email proposals to rebecca.snape@bcu.ac.uk by Friday 20th May 2016.

Reimagining further education conference – 29 June

29 June 2016, Curzon Building

The Centre for the Study of Practice and Culture in Education (C-SPACE) are hosting a one-day conference entitled ‘Reimagining Further Education’ at its City Centre Campus (Curzon Building).

Reimagining FE Conference Programme

The conference will bring together practitioners, researchers and key figures in the field of Further Education (FE) and will cover a range of themes from apprenticeships and work-based learning to accountability and governance in FE.

In keeping with the event’s title, ‘Reimagining Further Education’, the conference format is designed to maximise opportunities for collaboration and interaction amongst all those present.

Instead of the conventional ‘stand and deliver’ format of many conferences, ‘Reimagining Further Education’ will be organised as group conversations framed and facilitated by a discussant and chair for each of the 6 thematic strands included. By exploring positive, imaginative and creative ways forward that enhance agency, workforce development and the professional ethos of all FE practitioners, this conference aims to put the ‘confer’ back into conference!

Book tickets on the event page

Well-being 2016 conference – 5-6 September

5-6 September 2016, Birmingham City University

This year Well-being 2016 explores the multi-dimensions of well-being focusing on the achievements of well-being through collaboration – to co-create experiences which are positive and meaningful to the individual.

We aim to provide a platform for dialogue between academics and practitioners, knowledge exchange and methodological exploration through a combination of keynote speakers, breakout sessions and workshops.

Key Themes

  • Children’s well-being
  • Nature based solutions towards well-being
  • The context of the medical humanities
  • Recording, representing and evaluating the positive experience
  • Mentoring for well-being
  • Visioning and future thinking of well-being scenarios

Find out more on the website

 

Terrorism and cultural freedom conference – 7 June

Tuesday 7 June 2016 9.00am-6.00pm

Parkside Building, City Centre Campus

The first in a series of planned annual international conferences on topics of urgent social interest locally, nationally and globally, ‘Terrorism and Cultural Freedom’ assembles a group of world-leading commentators, scholars and artists to discuss the most pressing political and artistic concern of the world today.

This event is free. Please book via Eventbrite

Join us on 7 June for an intensive discussion of the most critical political issue now facing the world and the future of culture within it. Though terrorism is associated currently with fundamentalism originating in the Middle East (and with the response of western nation-states to it) forms of violent action against states, countries, cultures, groups and individuals has a very long history. There is also, arguably, an equally long history of terrorism against citizens conducted by states themselves holding a monopoly of violence. Keynote speakers WJT Mitchell, Tariq Ali, Anthony Downey and Dima Saber will offer incisive accounts of the stakes in this crisis, examining both ‘terror’ as an idea and its complex relations to a range of cultural and artistic practices, both historical and contemporary.

In addition to these contributions, the conference will include shorter presentations concerned with cultural freedom in an age of global terrorism, related to music, art, fashion, media, the moving image, writing and theatre drawn from experts within Birmingham City University’s own arts, design and media research communities, and including historical and contemporary examples. These speakers are David Roberts, Andrew Kulman and Jonathan Day. In addition, Paula Barreiro-Lopez and Mathew Teti offer perspectives from Spain and the USA.

Birmingham City University provides a rich learning and research context in which to consider these issues. Universities are themselves implicated now in the state response to terrorism by western governments given UK ‘Prevent’ legislation. The conference will enable this matter.

Book tickets now via Eventbrite

Research cafe: How Zotero can preserve your sanity and other stories

Thursday 28th January 2016, 12pm – 1:30pm, MP203 (CEBE Boardroom)

With Steve Murphy (School of Computing & Digital Technology)

Learn how using the free Zotero literature management and referencing tool allowed Steve to retain his last thread of sanity by making the chore of literature storage and referencing more bearable.

To register your interest e-mail Ian.McDonald@bcu.ac.uk.

Refreshments will be provided.