Full STEAM Ahead? The Creative Economy and Higher Education – 13 July

Parkside lecture theatre, 7pm-9pm, Wednesday 13 July. Drinks at 6.30pm

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Supported by Creative Advantage Fund and Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research

Full STEAM Ahead?  The Creative Economy and Higher Education

What are relations like between the creative economy and universities in the Midlands? What expectations do businesses, creatives, educators and students have of each other for innovation, work and reward in exchanges between them and their collaborations? What are the opportunities or impediments for exchange and for sustaining and growing the creative sector?

This symposium brings together a range of individuals representing experience in the creative sector and HE to discuss some of these questions in light of current issues and challenges for the economy, society and culture of the Midlands.

Discussants include: Thomas Dillon (CAF); Professor David Roberts (Pro Vice Chancellor Executive Dean of Art, Design and Media); Rebbecca Hemmings (Strawberry Words); Suriya Roberts-Grey (cultural entrepreneur); Matt Davidson (CAF Prizewinner); Amahra Spence (founder of MAIA Creatives). Chair: Professor Paul Long, BCMCR.

This event is supported by the Creative Advantage Fund (CAF).

The founding of CAF in 2000 was the first step in the UK’s experiment with venture capital as a funding mechanism for cultural production, reflecting a new approach in government to what became known as the “creative industries”, defined as “those industries which have their origin in individual creativity, skill and talent and which have a potential for wealth and job creation through the generation and exploitation of intellectual property” (DCMS, 1998). Despite success stories, the conditions under which policy goals can be achieved through the interaction of cultural practitioners and commercially-oriented finance remain uncertain.

The event will also see the announcement of the winner of the 2016 CAF-BCU Prize. 

The CAF-BCU Prize of £500 is awarded for the best dissertation on the creative industries submitted for degree purposes by a student at BCU.

All welcome. Register on Eventbrite.

Conservatoire researcher’s grant win featured in Times Higher

Professor Deborah Mawer of Birmingham Conservatoire has been featured in the Grant Winners section of the Times Higher Education for her successful bid for an Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) grant.

The grant, worth £461,583, is to lead a three-year project: ‘Accenting the Classics: Durand’s Édition classique (c. 1915-25) as a French Prism on the Musical Past’, in collaboration with Graham Sadler (Birmingham Conservatoire), Barbara L. Kelly (Royal Northern College of Music) and Rachel Moore (University of Oxford). This project will blend analytical, cultural and historical musicology with music performance to investigate the nature of the varying ‘French accent’ (Ravel’s ‘accent singulier’) given to earlier European piano music (the ‘Classics’) within Durand’s multi-volume edition, on the occasion of its centenary. The repertoire comprises music by well-known and since-forgotten composers, which was edited by well- and lesser-known early twentieth-century French composers, together with musicologists and teachers at the Paris Conservatoire.

Investigation will start with detailed analytical case studies of edited music. An initial group will include Ravel (editing Mendelssohn) and Debussy (Chopin); Emmanuel, Garban and Roger-Ducasse (Bach and Burgundian folksongs); balanced by music of the eighteenth-century French harpsichordists, including Couperin (edited by Tiersot) and Rameau (Diémer). Secondly, using blended archival, historical and interpretative skills, assessment of the role and wider cultural network of the Édition classique will offer new insights into early twentieth-century French cultural identity (for example, incipient neoclassicism); relations with twentieth-century French composers’ own music; canonic issues; Conservatoire pedagogy; wartime publishing, in the context of editions by Henry Expert, Saint-Saëns and Heugel. The project will also embrace how today’s users – students, scholars, musicians and the wider public – can benefit from (test out and inflect) this knowledge, including alternative interpretations for pianists and the promotion of ‘lost’ repertoire. ‘Accenting the Classics’ will run from summer 2016-2019.