Walk in Worcester

November 3rd, 10am

Come to Worcester and join fellow PhD researcher Greg Dunn on a small excursion around his home town. Engage your senses without the aid of photography. Experience a new place with your body and physically engage your ‘tourist gaze’. The walk will be semi-led, semi-informative but wholly immersive.
Details about the walk:
  • 2-3 hour walk around Worcester – mostly flat so no special footwear required (no stiles).
  • No photography of any kind (Camera or Smartphone) – this reflects Greg’s own research.
  • Stop for coffee/tea/cake along the way. (People might want to bring lunch)
  • Visit Worcester Cathedral (£1 needed for donations box)
  • People are free to do what they like after the walk (shop etc.)
12 funded places are available: Train tickets from Birmingham to Worcester are funded by the PGR Studio.
To book: please note that there is a maximum of 12 places – book by emailing admpgr-studio@bcu.ac.uk to make sure you get a place!
Greg Dunn is undertaking a collaborative research project funded by the AHRC and the Wye Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Birmingham Conservatoire Public Research Seminar Series- Martin Perkins and Emily van Evera

November 3rd, 3.30pm-5pm, Birmingham Conservatoire, tickets £4

Martin Perkins and Emily van Evera – ‘Lecture-Recital: Charlotte Bridgeman’s Music Collection’

Like all daughters of landed families in the eighteenth century, Charlotte Bridgeman, eldest daughter of the first Baron Bradford, of Weston Park, was taught music – one of the essential skills of eligible young ladies. She sang and played the harpsichord, made music with her family and collected sheet music of the day, which survives in the Weston Park Archives. Martin Perkins (harpsichord) is joined by renowned interpreter of early vocal music Emily Van Evera in a lecture-recital exploring Charlotte’s music collections, dating from her childhood to her married years, to give an intimate portrait of music-making in a country house.

You are warmly invited to Birmingham Conservatoire’s continuing Autumn 2015 Series of Public Research Seminars, which take place on selected Tuesday afternoons, 3.30-5.00 pm. Each semester’s programme now includes a dedicated Lecture-Recital that will offer a strong model for practice-based research.

These seminars are open to all, including members of the public. They are held in Birmingham city centre, just a five-minute walk from New Street Station, in the Conservatoire’s Arena Foyer (see map: http://www.bcu.ac.uk/about-us/maps-and-campuses/birmingham-conservatoire/map-and-directions).

Tickets available on the door.

CEBE Academic Writing session

November 4th, 2pm-3pm, 

Process of Writing with Dr Dimitar Angelov (Coventry University)

Aimed at research students, this session is hosted by the Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment at Birmingham City University.

For more information contact Ian McDonald at Ian.Mcdonald@bcu.ac.uk

Birmingham Conservatoire Public Research Seminar Series- Kevin Dawe

November 30th, 3.30pm-5.00pm, Birmingham Conservatoire, tickets £4

 

Professor Kevin Dawe (University of Kent) – ‘Could a Guitar Change the World? Guitar Making and Sustainability Studies’

Guitar maker Jay Duncan poses this question as he goes out to his Uganda-based workshop, where the local community has access to several Africa-based sources of wood, including mahogany, mugavu and ebony. If a guitar could change the world, could it also play a role in saving it? What, then, should we make of guitar maker Mark Bailey based in Scotland, who claims that all his acoustic guitars are handmade in the UK using only renewable energy sources? In the case studies for this research seminar, Professor Kevin Dawe, from the University of Kent, discusses how those materials-become-instruments are enmeshed in complex networks, and infrastructures of ecological, socio-cultural, political and economic relations and significance.

You are warmly invited to Birmingham Conservatoire’s continuing Autumn 2015 Series of Public Research Seminars, which take place on selected Tuesday afternoons, 3.30-5.00 pm. Each semester’s programme now includes a dedicated Lecture-Recital that will offer a strong model for practice-based research.

These seminars are open to all, including members of the public. They are held in Birmingham city centre, just a five-minute walk from New Street Station, in the Conservatoire’s Arena Foyer (see map: http://www.bcu.ac.uk/about-us/maps-and-campuses/birmingham-conservatoire/map-and-directions).

Tickets available on the door.

Type Talks – Yves Peters: Trajan in Movie Posters

November 12th, 5.30-7.30pm, Typographic Hub 

Yves Peters: Trajan in movie posters

Soon after its appearance on the font market more than twenty years ago, the Adobe Original Trajan was embraced by Hollywood. Now it seems to grace more movie posters than any other typeface. Its stately and classic character shapes made it the go-to choice for Oscar material. Yet in recent years the popular font has apparently fallen from grace, and a pretender to the throne is vying to take its placeMore information here.

Yves Peters is a graphic designer / rock drummer / father of three who tries to be critical about typography without coming across as a snob. Former editor-in-chief of The FontFeed, he has found a new home on FontShop News. Yves writes about type and talks at conferences. His ability to identify most typefaces on sight is utterly useless in daily life.

Book your FREE ticket here.

Registration opens at 1730. Talk scheduled 1800-1930

TYPE TALKS are organised by The Typographic Hub, part of the Centre for Printing History & Culture at BCU.

Pop up prof: Kathleen Donnelly

November 18th, 1pm-2pm, Parkside Lecture Theatre

Dr Kathleen Donnelly: Such Friends

What we can learn about creative people in groups.

The poet W B Yeats wrote, ‘Say my glory was I had such friends.’

In the early years of the last century, writers and artists congregated in salons, to chat and fight and discuss their work: Yeats and his ‘such friends’ in the Irish Literary Renaissance, Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury group, Gertrude Stein and the Americans in Paris, and Dorothy Parker and the Algonquin Round Table. What can we learn about how these relationships enhanced the creativity of those involved? And how can we make use of this research to help our own and our students’ work in groups?

This talk is part of the 2015-16 Pop-up-Professor series at the Faculty of Arts, Design & Media, BCU.

No need to book, just turn up!

Filtering the Universe

18 November, 2pm-3.30pm, P130 Parkside building

From interviews and artworks to musical compositions and journal articles, data in Arts, Design & Media research takes various forms. This PGR Studio workshop covers practical, digital and other strategies to help you filter the Universe when gathering, organising and managing data for your literature review.

Book a place by emailing admpgr-studio@bcu.ac.uk.

Shut up and Write!

25th November 2pm-4pm, Parkside P233

The PGR Studio’s monthly Shut Up & Write sessions provide the time and the space for you to focus and get on with your own writing.

Whatever stage you are at in your PhD, join us over coffee and a biscuit or two to increase your writing productivity with like-minded researchers.

School of English annual lecture

November 30th 5pm-6pm, Lecture theatre C192, Curzon Building

The Tongue that Shakespeare Spoke: Professor David Crystal

The movement to present Shakespeare in ‘original pronunciation’ (OP) – a linguistic reconstruction of the accents used in his day – has gathered pace since 2004, when OP productions of Romeo and Juliet and Troilus and Cressida took place at Shakespeare’s Globe in London. This talk describes the OP events that have taken place during the past decade, explains the nature of the evidence that led to the reconstruction, and illustrates some of the literary and theatrical discoveries that have been made.

David Crystal is currently patron of the International Association of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language (IATEFL) and the Association for Language Learning (ALL), president of the UK National Literacy Association, and an honorary vice-president of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists, the Institute of Linguists, and the Society for Editors and Proofreaders. He is a past honorary president of the National Association for Professionals concerned with Language-Impaired Children, the International Association of Forensic Phonetics, and the Society of Indexers. He was Sam Wanamaker Fellow at Shakespeare’s Globe in 2003-4 and was honorary president of the Johnson Society for 2005-6. He has also been a member of the Board of the British Council and of the English-Speaking Union. He received an OBE for services to the English language in 1995, and was made a Fellow of the British Academy (FBA) in 2000. He now lives in Holyhead, where he is the director of the Ucheldre Centre, a multi-purpose arts and exhibition centre.

This is a public event. You can reserve a place through Eventbrite here.

Professor Crystal will have a selection of his books for sale after the lecture and will be signing copies.

Punk Now! The 2nd Annual Punk Scholars Network Conference and Postgraduate Symposium

Thursday 29 October, 9am-5.30pm and Friday 30 October 9am-5pm, The Shell, Parkside building, City Centre Campus

Following the dynamic emergence of punk in the UK, USA and Europe in the 1970s, the subculture spread widely. As punk and new wave gained commercial and critical success, together with an attractive notoriety, it soon began an ongoing journey around the globe – both as a product and as an ideology.

Punk, then, despite its omnipresence in contemporary underground and popular cultures, is clearly more than legacy music.

More than forty years after the proto-punk progenitors of Detroit and New York unconsciously launched an underground revolution, to continue what some of the 60’s and 70’s anarchic counter culture propagated, and after untold premature obituaries, it appears that punk – in terms of music, philosophy, and identity – remains in rude health.

This joint conference and postgraduate symposium seeks to illuminate the current landscape of contemporary punk in all of its global, musical, political and (sub)cultural manifestations.

Visit the website to register and for more information