School of Art alumni in ‘blockbuster’ V&A exhibition

Ian Emes, a Fine Art graduate from Birmingham City University, features in Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

The exhibition, a retrospective of the British band, has been one of the museum’s most visited shows, attracting over 300,000 visitors. Its popularity has prompted the museum to extend its run until mid-October.

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Ian Emes

Emes, who had a solo show at Parkside Gallery in 2013, plays a major part in the exhibition.

The School of Art graduate worked regularly with Pink Floyd in the 70s, producing animations for their iconic animated concerts. The Dark Side of the Moon (1974), which includes the famous ‘time sequence,’ featured in the rock band’s internationally acclaimed concert tour.

Emes has produced animations for numerous other international musicians including Mike Oldfield and Paul McCartney. His animations are iconic of 70s pop culture.

As well as working with famous rock musicians, Emes has produced a series of other projects over the last five decades. Other works include a music video for Duran Duran, commercials and numerous television series.

Recently, Emes has directed Bookaboo, a children’s programme which is going into its second series on CITV.

Emes’ success has led to his inclusion in numerous group exhibitions in recent years at The Horse Hospital, London, and Ikon, Birmingham.

Current projects include a collaboration with dance artists Flock Dance in what is set to be a spectacular collision of cinema and live performance.

His work will soon feature in David Gilmour Live at Pompeii which airs in cinemas on 13 September.

 

Top 10 art events in Birmingham

As the new university year begins there is plenty to see and do around the city. With exhibitions, events and festivals, Birmingham’s art scene offers something for everyone.

Parkside Gallery has picked its top 10 events and exhibitions in Birmingham this autumn.

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Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery

I Want! I Want!: Art & Technology at the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery

The Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery (BMAG) is the city’s biggest art museum. As well as a large collection of pre-Raphaelite paintings and historic objects it hosts contemporary exhibitions.

I Want! I Want!: Art and Technology features some of the most influential artists of the last 20 years. But you’ll have to be quick to catch this exhibition before it closes on 1 October.

(1 April – 1 October 2017)

Connecting Stories: Our British Asian Heritage at the Library of Birmingham

The Library of Birmingham doesn’t only hold books. It also puts on exhibitions and music events throughout the year.

Its upcoming exhibition, Connecting Stories: Our British Asian Heritage, will explore Britain’s 400 year relationship with South Asia. Celebrating Birmingham’s diversity, the exhibition will investigate how this connection has shaped the city.

(15 July – 4 November 2017)

Digbeth First Friday

Digbeth is a thriving hub of upcoming artists and spaces.

The first Friday of every month Digbeth comes alive. Live music, street food and entertainment fill the streets as galleries and venues host a range of late night events.

(The first Friday of every month, 6pm until late.)

Pleasure is a Weapon at Grand Union

Susie Green’s first UK solo show, Pleasure is a Weapon will combine sculpture, performance and painting in an exhibition at the forefront of contemporary art.

Look out for a series of performances, talks and screenings that will accompany the exhibition.

(1 September – 18 November 2017)

Saddleworth Moor: Responding to a Landscape at the Midlands Arts Centre (MAC)

The MAC’s upcoming exhibition redefines landscape photography. Saddleworth Moor: Responding to a Landscape showcases the work of photographer Matthew Murray and his unique approach to photographing the world.

Also check out the MAC’s packed programme of theatre, cinema and art events.

(18 November 2017 – 21 January 2018)

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Brummagen at Parkside Gallery

Well we had to include one of our own exhibitions at some point. And Brummagem deserves its place on the list!

Sara Kulman and Andrew Kulman chart the history of Birmingham’s buildings in Parkside’s upcoming exhibition. Illustrations, paper sculptures and animations explore the overwhelming sense of nostalgia as Birmingham is redesigned and regenerated.

(18 September – 27 October 2017)

Portrait of the Artist: Käthe Kollwitz at Ikon Gallery

Ikon gallery is one of the city’s most distinguished galleries. Situated in Brindley Place, Ikon hosts national and international artists in a packed programme of exhibitions and events.

In its upcoming exhibition, Portrait of the Artist: Kathe Kollwitz, Ikon explores the life and works of Kollwitz – one of the leading artists of the early 20th century. Showcasing 40 prints from the British Museum collection, this exhibition offers a rare opportunity to experience the emotional quality of Kollwitz’s drawings.

(13 September – 26 November 2017)

Fierce Festival

Fierce Festival is one of the country’s biggest live art festivals. For one week it fills the city with theatre, dance, music, installations and live art.

This years’ highlights include Be the Change at the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery and live art in Victoria Square.

(16 October – 22 October 2017)

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The New Art Gallery Walsall

Legacies: JMW Turner and contemporary art practice at The New Art Gallery Walsall

Not all of the Birmingham’s art is in the centre of the city. The New Art Gallery Walsall is one of many acclaimed galleries that exist across the region.

Works by Turner and the contemporary artists that he has inspired come together in a unique exhibition as part of the gallery’s ongoing partnership with the Tate.

(22 September 2017 – 14 January 2018)

Birmingham Weekender

Birmingham Weekender is the city’s biggest art festival, hosted by some of Birmingham’s most prestigious venues.

This year’s festival is jam-packed with dance, exhibitions, parties, curator talks and much more. With events ranging from an orchestra in a multi-storey carpark to an Art Rave at the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, the Birmingham Weekender looks set to be a highlight of the year.

(22 September – 24 September 2017)

All Because of You: Northern Soul Portraits

A photographic exploration of Young Northern Soulies in Birmingham and the Midlands

27 January – 24 February 2017

‘Chloe’, image permissions via Bethany Kane Photography

Coming to Parkside Gallery this January is the work of Birmingham-based independent photographer Bethany Kane and Sarah Raine, a researcher for the Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research. They have documented the underground northern soul scene in Birmingham and the West Midlands through what Raine describes as a “curated collection of photographs, audio, memorabilia and scene insider accounts.”

The exhibition takes its name from the 1967 hit track, All Because of You, by The Dramatics. A true classic, it is a must-listen for anyone interested in this pivotal period of music and culture. You can listen to the track below…

The exhibition has a focus on the younger ‘Soulies’ on the scene, which has been achieved through ethnographic studies of Northern Soul in Birmingham and the West Midlands. Raine has been awarded a rare insight into the social mechanics of this secretive cultural movement, which is firmly underground within the wider music scene.

A 19-year old Birmingham-based Soulie called Nancy said the scene had been crucial to shaping her personal identity…

“Before [finding] Northern Soul…the clothes I [would] wear, I felt like it wasn’t me and I never really knew why… I just felt like I didn’t belong here. I didn’t really like people’s opinions on stuff and I didn’t like listening to the music they listened to. I didn’t know what was out there for me and then after my first all-nighter, I just felt like a completely different person, that I’d finally found who I was and that’s all down to the music.”

I can personally identify with Nancy as I felt the same before I experienced the beauty and vibrancy of the Northern Soul music scene. I couldn’t relate to what people my age were doing and experiencing, I knew I liked Motown and Soul but there was something missing. There’s something about the music and the passion of the people that surround you within a Northern Soul event, you can be yourself – or anyone you want to be. I feel that it is so important to listen to young people, to their stories, memories and experiences within this city and within wider society. I feel this to be the crux of the exhibition, as there has been a real care and concern for how this is affecting young people.

As Raine has said: “This exhibition aims to explore how these young people place themselves within the dominant ways of seeing the scene, and how they make their engagement meaningful as both a Northern Soulie and a young person in the 21st century.”

Here at Parkside Gallery we are getting ready for the upcoming show. To follow our progress you can access our social media below, and that of AllBecauseofNS …

https://twitter.com/ParksideGallery

https://www.instagram.com/parksidegallery/

https://www.facebook.com/parksidegallerybirmingham

Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research www.bcmcr.org

Bethany Kane http://www.bethanykane.co.uk

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/events/551044365085019/

Twitter @AllBecauseOfNS

Instagram https://www.instagram.com/allbecauseofns/

Leanne O’Connor is a Fine Artist, Curator and Collaborator based in Birmingham, UK. She works as a Marketing and Exhibitions Assistant here at Parkside gallery, and is in her final year on the BA (Hons) Fine Art Course at Birmingham School of Art.

‘In the Loupe’ @ Vittoria Street Gallery, School of Jewellery

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Over head view of ‘In the Loupe‘ @ Vittoria Street Gallery

‘In the Loupe’ is the inaugural show for the new Vittoria Street Gallery at the School of Jewellery. The exhibition brings together a multi-disciplinary group of ‘artists, educators, researchers and practitioners from the School of Jewellery, Birmingham City University and The Plymouth College of Art and Design’  (Zoe Robertson). The show is also applauding the work of School of Jewellery Alumni, in addition to the Gallerist Victoria Stewart, as she is celebrating her 10th Anniversary as Director of The Victoria Stewart Contemporary Jewellery Gallery.

The creators exhibiting are as follows:

Dauvit Alexander, Beaulagh Brooks, Sybella Buttress, Rachael Colley, Sally Collins, Sian Hindle, Andrew Howard, Bridie Lander, Anna Lorenz, Jo Pond, Claire Price, Zoe Robertson, Fern Robinson, Kate Thorley and Maria Whetman.

Zoe Robertson kindly gave us a Curators Tour of the new exhibition,and her insights are reflected throughout this article.

“What we’re trying to do is celebrate the depth and diversity of what we do here at the School of Jewellery, each member of staff has a really different voice, a really different style and a really different practice or concept that they are exploring”

– Zoe Robertson

The exhibition truly emphasizes the ever changing nature of the Jewellery Industry, as there is an eclectic mix of designing, methods and materials used. The show will be highlighting the breadth of talent of those involved, through the collaboration between The Plymouth College of Art and Design and School of Jewellery, Birmingham City University. There is an interesting contrast between these jewellery styles, with the coastal landscape evidently reflected in the materials and textures used in the Plymouth alumni’s pieces as demonstrated by Sybella Batress in her use of sea-life-like textures and Maria Whetman’s use of precious materials that are reminiscent of coastal rock formations. (Pictured below)

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Maria Whetman, Plymouth College of Art and Design Alumni.

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Plymouth College of Art and Design Alumni

Whereas the Birmingham based Makers styles are more reflective of the Industrial Landscape that this city offers – echoed in the various tones and treatments of the metals and materials used in the works.

These industrial, aged textures are prominent in Jo Pond’s work. Jo pond is a narrative Jeweller who creates works that are extremely multi-faceted in narrative, materiality and meaning. Her work really resonated within me and I feel it was one of the strongest within the exhibition.

 

I come from a family of ‘Ponds’ who appear to have a genetic necessity for hoarding and a passion for objects which others might not quite appreciate… Some of these find their way into my work.’ – Jo Pond, Jopond.com

 

According to colleague Pete Croton, ‘ Jo takes old objects, is able to retain the original quality, and turns them in to something beautiful’. Croton went on to explain the original objects, revealing one as a match stick holder, beautifully crafted and adorned with lettering that created a new narrative within the piece. Zoe Robertson expanded upon this by explaining that the lettering on the piece was  taken and reconstructed from old biscuit tins. (Picture Below)

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Works By Jo Pond, School of Jewellery Alumni

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To find out more about Jo Ponds practice, you can visit her website: jopond.com

The Curator and Director of  The Victoria Street Gallery – Zoe Robertson has exhibited a past work (pictured below), that was part of the development of Flockamania. You can find out more about Flockamania at Parkside Gallery by viewing our past blog post on the show. Flockamania fused performance and contemporary jewellery making that resulted in an innovative and vibrant Show and series of performances.

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Work By Zoe Robertson, Director of Vittoria Street Gallery

“My past work has been a real investigation in materials, I really like industrial materials that aren’t used in the traditional, commercial side of jewellery”

– Zoe Robertson

The detailing that has gone in to this piece is immense, with a multitude of processes being utilised. Such as flocking; sublimation and vacuum forming. The outstanding qualities of the work is firstly in the drawing that has been sublimated on to the work. Using special inks that has been transferred using heat and pressure. Secondly, in the vibrancy achieved in the flocking that adorns the entirety of the work.

 Overall the show is an eclectic and engaging inaugural show for Victoria Street Gallery, which reflects the breadth of the Jewellery Industry and the talent of the makers both at Birmingham City University and The Plymouth College of Art and design.

All those involved in the realisation of ‘In the Loupe’ should be congratulated. We look forward to more successful exhibitions!

The exhibition is running until Friday 16th December 2016.

The Gallery is open Monday to Friday, 10am – 4pm, term time only. Please be aware that the Gallery is not open on weekends.

To keep up to date with the new Victoria Street Gallery and for more information on the individual practitioners, you can access the links below:

https://victoriasewart.com/exhibitions/in-the-loupe-exhibition-in-conjunction-with-plymouth-art-weekender/

https://twitter.com/soj_bcu?lang=en

https://twitter.com/Vittoria_S

Leanne O’Connor works as a Marketing and Events Assistant here at Parkside Gallery, and is in her Final Year on the BA (Hons) Fine Art Course at Margaret Street School of Art.

Midlands Modern from 1930 to 1980

Design, and Manufacturing in the Midlands

7th November – 14th January

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Swirl Design – part of the Fiestaware range manufactured by Chance Glass of Smethwick

A showcase of products manufactured by Midlands based companies working with significant designers during the period from 1930 to 1980, highlighting innovative and modernist design. The show will celebrate this Mid-century period – a period during which the Midlands maintained its reputation as ‘the workshop of the world’.

Midlands Modern will contain work from a number of different disciplines, such as lighting, glass, ceramics and furniture. Highlighting and showcasing the breadth of manufacturing in the Midlands.

Featuring in the exhibition is the work of Lady Margaret Casson; an architect, designer and photographer. Margaret Casson had remarkable talent. She studied at the Bartlett School of Architecture University College, London during the 1930s and was one of the few women on the architectural design course at the time. Casson went on to have an accomplished career as an architect and in a number of other design related fields.

She collaborated with Chance Glass in Smethwick to create one of their most well-known and highly collectable patterns – Night Sky (1957). Along with patterns such as Swirl (1955) and Calypto (1959), as part of their ‘Fiestaware’ range during the 50’s. Fiestaware was Chance’s most successful creation: mass produced and affordable glassware for the domestic market.

 “This glassware was produced flat-rolled sheet glass with decorative screen- and transfer-prints applied prior to it being formed to shape, by reheating and slumping

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Night Sky has a clear modernist vibe, with the angular, minimal silk transfers forming what seems like constellations, with golden gilding adorning the rims of the glassware. We are looking forward to exhibiting some these exquisite modernist pieces in collaboration with the Glass Museum in Stourbridge.

Returning to Parkside Gallery will be the works of Tibor Reich, one of the 20th century’s most celebrated textile designers – who notably livened up Post-war Britain with his taste in bright and vividly coloured textiles. Reich fled from war-torn Hungary in 1937 to study textiles at Leeds University. After the completion of his studies he bought a 19th Century cotton mill in Stratford – upon – Avon and established Tibor Ltd. It is more famously known as the Clifford Mill, and it is where Tibor established his career in producing and designing woven and printed textiles, ceramics, tiles and rugs.

“Reich freed colour from the pre-war 2D woven textile, and reimagined it in a revolutionary new way of weaving, that ‘brought a pattern out of texture”

Reich, Tibor (1959). “Responsibility of the Designer To-Day”. Journal of Textile Institute.

Also returning to Parkside Gallery are Brinton’s Carpets, who began manufacturing their world-renowned carpet designs in 1783, in Kidderminster. A town that is inextricably linked to the carpet manufacturing industry, and known at one point as the ‘Woven Carpet Capital of the World’.

Brinton’s market leading modernist design the ‘Bell Twist’ went into manufacturing in 1965, and celebrated its 50th-anniversary last year. The design is still a popular British domestic textile to this day, down to the large variety of shades on offer and the strong wool-rich yarn used to create the famed permanent twist. This ensures that the textile can withstand the rigours of family life.

In 1993, Britons Bell twist carpets were transformed in collaboration with notorious Punk designer Vivienne Westwood. She produced eccentric twists on traditional and modernist fashion trends – proving the versatility of Brinton’s Carpets. This collection was part of Brinton’s first advertising campaign, with Vivienne Westwood’s iconic carpet dresses at the forefront. Westwood’s’ yellow floral carpet ball gown stands in the Brinton’s office in Kidderminster to this day.

Amongst a number of other disciplines, Midlands Modern highlights the contribution of the Midlands to Modernist and Contemporary design history, championing the midlands as a creative hub that is still just as relevant today.

Midlands Modern will be on show from the 7th November untill  the 14th January. You can follow the progress of the show on the Parkside Gallery Blog and our related social media:

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

 

 

 

New Birmingham Arts Map

The end of July sees the release of the new Birmingham Art Map. The map will include the latest exhibition and event details from 1st August until 31st October. The map covers the many events and exhibitions held in venues within the greater Birmingham area and will include listings for our very own Parkside Gallery.

Arts map Capture

Look out for the print versions which should be available for free at many outlets, retailers and cafes toward the end of July.

If you can’t wait for the schedule to come out in print, you can check out http://birminghamartmap.org/information/ for the latest details or follow @_artmap on twitter. The new maps will be hitting Parkside Gallery foyer soon.

A look back at the #BCUInspired Festival

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Now in its Second Year the #BCUInspired Festival has proven to be a vibrant and exciting event for everyone. The Festival contained a number of graduate exhibitions that showcased the innovative talent of Birmingham City University (BCU) Students across the Arts, Design and Media sites. During the Inspired Festival, Parkside Gallery participated by showcasing an exhibition titled ‘BCU: A Year in Pictures’ encapsulating various special moments from around the university in 2015/16.

The Inspired Festival launched with a special screening of Tarantino’s classic Pulp Fiction, which was voted as Best Film of the 90’s by BCU Staff and Students.

The first graduate show private view was held at the School of Art. It was an engaging and challenging evening that showcased the multi-medium practices of final year Fine Art and Art and Design Students. The inspired event was accompanied by an awards ceremony with prizes given to students in disciplines that included Sculpture, Painting, Photography and Curation. The Prestigious Pip Seymour Painting Prize being awarded to Tabi Lampe for her vibrant and atmospheric paintings.

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Set against the dramatic backdrop of the historic building, Birmingham school of Jewellery showcased a diverse range of work within areas such as Gemmology, Horology, Silversmithing and Jewellery practice.  One of the most striking elements was the multi-disciplinary nature of the work, highly relevant to the industry and contemporary jewellery making. Andrew Glover from BA (Hons) Horology went away with four Awards, most notably the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers Award and the Cartier Award.

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The night of the 15th June was the largest Faculty of Arts, Design and Media private view, welcoming over 1000 visitors to Parkside building. Shows filled all four floors – bringing together Industry partners, alumni, staff and family to celebrate the student’s achievements. Some of the most prestigious awards came from Furniture Design, Architecture and Textiles Design. Triple Award Winner Beau Birkett was awarded with the Louisa Ann Ryland Scholarship, which will fund his travel to Copenhagen to work in the Furniture design industry for a month.

The second year of the Inspired Festival has been a huge success, it’s generated a large amount of  interest and strengthened links to industry. We’re looking forward to next year’s shows and wish all of our graduates every success in their future endeavors.