Category Archives: Reports

Event 2: Teaching and Curriculum Design Workshop

Midlands Philosophy Research Training Network
Birmingham, Birmingham City, Keele, Staffordshire, Warwick

Event 2: Teaching and Curriculum Design Workshop
Birmingham City University, 2 December 2009

REPORT ON FEEDBACK
Attendance: 7 PhD students (BCU: 1, Birmingham: 2, Warwick: 4)

Quantitative questionnaire scores (averages, marked out of 5):

Sessions:

Running seminars and lecturing to a large class: 4.6

Curriculum development: 4.7

Designing a whole module: 4.7

Overall:

Content of the workshop: 4.7

Presentation of the workshop: 4.6

Overall satisfaction: 4.7

All the participants except one said they were ‘very they approach their PhD/professional development activities as a result of the workshop.

Some comments from participants:

• “Really focused on philosophy- lots of detailed knowledge.”

• “The curriculum design discussion was particularly illuminating.”

Suggestions for improvement/additions from participants:

• “Even more focus on specific philosophy centred work.”

• “Some time set aside to have a go at designing modules.”

• “A ward a certificate of attendance.”

Comments from workshop presenter:

Dr David Mossley (Manager of the Subject Centre for Philosophical and Religious Studies) delivered the first session which was well received.

There was lively discussion and participants felt that they had gained a great deal from the day as a whole. Several of them remarked that the workshops met a real need from both students and departments that was not wholly satisfied by the generic training usually offered to doctoral students. Everyone who has participated in the workshops thought that they will gain much from the network in terms of professional development, networking and information.

The comments about practical activities and working through a module in detail are useful. Time constraints impose selectivity on what material can be covered but it should be possible to incorporate both these suggestions in future deliveries of the workshop.

It is worth considering introducing a certificate of attendance.

Report on Workshop 4 at Staffordshire University

Midlands Philosophy Research Training Network

Birmingham, Birmingham City, Keele, Staffordshire, Warwick

 

Event 4: Employability for Early Stage PhD Researchers

Staffordshire University, 11 March 2009

 

REPORT ON FEEDBACK

Attendance: 4 PhD students (Staffs : 3, Warwick : 1)

Quantitative questionnaire scores (averages, marked out of 5):

Sessions:

Comparative National systems of doctoral training   5.0

Reading and understanding job advertisements         4.5

What to expect in application & interview:                4.5

How to start preparing your CV now.                                    4.5

Overall:

Content of the workshop:                                           4.8

Presentation of the workshop:                                                4.8

Overall satisfaction:                                                    4.8

 

Everyone said they were ‘very likely’ to change some aspect of how they approach their PhD/professional development activities as a result of the workshop.

 

Some comments from participants:

  • “Very pleased with the discussions and concrete advice”
  • “[This] helps me reflect on the wider professional context of my work”

 

Suggestions for improvement/additions from participants:

  • “I’d like it better if the workshop started in the morning and finished earlier in the afternoon”
  • “It would have been nice to have longer discussion periods at the end of each session”

 

Comments from workshop presenter:

Professor Douglas Burnham: The aim of this session was to work backwards from what a well-qualified candidate looks like to the steps that a PhD researcher can take now in order to reach that point. I think this went down well, and there was some revealing, detailed and practical discussion. I picked up on the idea of looking at real job advertisements from the feedback to event 1. The international dimension to the presentations was welcomed.

I believe I made a mistake in timetabling, in not quite leaving sufficient time in each session for discussion – once the ideas and examples start flowing, in fact, each session could have been double the length – and in running rather too long into the afternoon. The latter decision was to try to encourage more part-time PhD students to come along,

Report on Workshop 2 (Dec 3rd 2008)

Midlands Philosophy Research Training Network

Birmingham, Birmingham City, Keele, Staffordshire, Warwick

 

Event 2: Teaching and Curriculum Design Workshop

Birmingham City University, 3 December 2008

 

REPORT ON FEEDBACK

Attendance: 5 PhD students (BCU : 3, Warwick : 2)

(3 students did not attend despite registering with apologies received from 1.)

Quantitative questionnaire scores (averages, marked out of 5):

Sessions:

Running seminars and lecturing to a large class:        5.0

Curriculum development:                                            4.8

Designing a whole module:                                         4.8

 

Overall:

Content of the workshop:                                           4.8

Presentation of the workshop:                                    5.0

Overall satisfaction:                                                    5.0

 

Everyone said they were ‘very likely’ to change some aspect of how they approach their PhD/professional development activities as a result of the workshop.

 

Some comments from participants:

  • “The whole workshop was of the highest quality.”
  • “I’m looking forward to the fully developed website of the RTN.”

 

Suggestions for improvement/additions from participants:

  • “It would be good to work through a module in detail to see how all the ideas are actually applied.”
  • “More attendees please!”
  • “More (if there’s time!) practical activities.”

 

Comments from workshop presenter:

Dr David Mossley (Manager of the Subject Centre for Philosophical and Religious Studies- www.prs.heacademy.ac.uk) delivered the first session which was very well received.

I am pleased that everyone found it both useful and enjoyable but as with the first workshop it is a shame that attendance was not higher. Everyone who has participated in the workshops is keen to see the development of the research training network and thinks that they will gain much from it in terms of professional development, networking and information.

The comments about practical activities and working through a module in detail are useful. Time constraints impose selectivity on what material can be covered but it should be possible to incorporate both these suggestions in future deliveries of the workshop