Tag Archives: bcu

Sharing Economy: the ‘use, don’t own’ notion

Traditionally, the consumer’s behaviour has been immersed in a linear economy in which products are made, used and disposed of. Nevertheless, since 2014 a new trend has been taking place: the sharing or circular economy.

Under this new system, the consumption of products and services is moving from owning to sharing and renting. This encourages reusing and recycling in order to give a better use of goods and skills, which not only provides an innovative experience but also an economical benefit.

The ‘use, don’t own’ notion

According to Vincent Rousselet, director of consultancy Vincent Rousselet & Associates, there are 4 factors that have been essential in the spring and development of this peer to peer consumption model:

  • The recent credit crunch has made people reconsider their consumption patterns.
  • The increased development of the internet and the global connectivity
  • The tracking of user online behaviour provides valuable, predictive insights (big data)
  • The rise in the user’s consciousness of the consequences of consumerism, regarding specifically the global climate change.

So far, the technological platforms are the foundation and main channels that let this collaborative system evolve around the world. The Nesta report ‘Making Sense of the UK Collaborative Economy’, states that in 2014 “25 per cent of UK adults used internet technologies to share assets/resources over the last year.”

Some of the most outstanding examples are Airbnb and Uber. The first one encourages individuals to share their homes for short periods of time while the latter transforms private cars into resources for public transportation. Most of these companies are for-profit services that only keep a small fraction of the fees charged.

According to the Journalist’s Resource, Airbnb has over 10 million guest-stays on their records and 500.000 properties listed while Uber is doubling its profits every 6 months.

Even though this economic model has worldwide detractors that argue it replaces secure jobs through a trend of part-time, low-paid work, there are already around 860 start-ups in this sector. Accounting for 1 in 10 of these, the UK is the European capital of the sharing economy.

Stand out start-ups

Since these peer-to-peer services are an alternative towards the fulfillment of the different consumption patterns, there are several start-ups that are worth noting due to its creativity or valuable contribution to a more sustainable socio-economic model:

1. Feeding Forward (United States)

Sharing economyThis platform allows any kind of business can request a pick up of their food surplus. Considered to be a donation, it is afterwards delivered to nearby shelters in need. The objective is to allow companies to receive a tax reduction and reduce disposal costs while ending hunger in the world.

 2. Fon (Spain)

Sharing economyThrough millions of hotspots around the world, it enables users to share their WiFi network in exchange of getting this service for free in any of the 16 countries that are part of their network. It started with residential wireless connection only and then moved forward to small, medium and large venues.

 3. Misterbnb (United States)

Screen Shot 2016-01-14 at 03.03.11With 30.000 hosts in 130 countries, this is the largest gay travel accommodation in the world. The objective is to develop a sense of belonging by helping this community to travel safely while learning local insider tips.

 4. Hassle (United Kingdom)

sharing economyRegardless of the venue (room, flat or even a mansion) this company is able to provide a local professional cleaner in a 60-second online request. No matter if it is a one-off, weekly or a fortnightly clean, the cost per hour will always be the same and it can be refunded if the service is not good enough.

5. Pley (United States)

sharing economySubscription platform that allows families to rent toys for a short period of time (as kids grow). Through a 70% cost reduction and the elimination of clutter, the aim is to raise a playful, creative generation aware of the principles of sharing and waste reduction.

 6. Kiwi (Colombia)

sharing economyAs long as it is legal, this company challenges users to ask them for any kind of service or product. Food, alcohol, electronics, reservations, plane tickets, health care services, clowns and even pranks can be requested. Through a network of national and international providers, Kiwi is capable of providing a 24/7 service in Bogota and Mexico City.

The Sharing Economy has had a smashing beginning. Even though it seems to be a promising land entailing a social, cultural, economic and environmental transformation, it is paramount to create global and local legal frameworks able to regulate its proper implementation.

If this system manages to integrate and assemble the multiple society sectors under a common good premise, in the future we might discover that we are currently in a historic transitional period towards a new worldwide economic model.

Written by Estefanía Jurado Rodríguez

Working on a live brief: Interview with Future Media student Julia Ivorra Harrison

On the Future Media MA you work on live briefs, what’s that like?

At first you work on real briefs but simultaneously alongside the lecturers. The client never sees your work so you are free to make mistakes and learn as you go. Another benefit of this is that you have an inside knowledge of the company you are working on as our lecturers have actually worked on these briefs so they know what the outcomes will be. They can guide you and mentor you more easily as they know the project inside out.

Working on the live brief for Bridgestone was good because it really helps to prepare us for when we are more experienced and working on real briefs. As you are working with guidance you gain the confidence to try out ideas you may have been afraid to by yourself! You have freedom to go crazy with your ideas and test them out without the fear of making a mistake and if you do get stuck you have a team to help you out.

What were the challenges of this project?

We had three things to consider in the brief that we were given. Firstly Bridgestone are currently running a competition to meet Valentino Rossi, the Superbike Rider who they sponsor, all you have to do is purchase some tyres. They have created a campaign to promote this featuring a ‘Yellow Man’ who stalks Rossi. We needed to use this in our social media strategy.

Bridgestone also sponsor skiing events and have a giant ski sculpture made from tyres that is available for promotional use over the summer – when this campaign will run. The challenge here was to figure out how the ski sculpture could be used, A – in the summer and B – in the UK where you cannot ski.

Our third challenge was how to target female customers.

How did you manage all of your ideas?

We met with key Parker at their office in Lutterworth to discuss Bridgestone’s social media strategy in the UK. Their social media presence in the USA is really strong so we looked closely at their campaigns. The team; Neil Horne, Richard Duffy and myself, then went away and came up with 15 ideas. We went back and presented these to the agency during a tissue session where they separated the good ideas from the bad. During this session 7 good ideas were chosen for development so we went away and worked on those. When they had been fleshed out we went back and presented them again and the best one was chosen.

 

20130605-210637.jpg

How did you prepare for the big pitch?

We all worked together to perfect the final idea and make sure all the details were exactly as we wanted ready for the pitch. It was exciting and also scary as the director of the company was there but we were prepared and confident with our campaign.

Bridgestone liked your idea! What now?

We have been asked to work alongside Key Parker over the summer to help with the execution of our campaign. We will be attending events where we will get to witness our ideas in action and see the project through to the end.

 

Hayley McCaffery

Digital Marketing and Communication Assistant

Working on a live brief: Key Parker & Bridgestone Europe

OVERVIEW

Key Parker, a long established and successful midlands agency, work with Bridgestone across Europe and support them with their marketing on and offline. As the worlds largest tyre manufacturer Bridgestone are always looking to the lead the way not only in tyres but communications too.

With brand values such as Serving Society Through Superior Quality and the desire to reinforce the brand position of Toughness the Future Media team were briefed to deliver a full pitch around a number of events and occasions coming up in the Bridgestone marketing calendar.

 THE BRIEF

Bridgestone sponsors Valentino Rossi, the Superbike Rider, and a campaign has been created around The Yellow Man – Rossi’s new persona. How can this be driven across UK & Ireland and extended as a social campaign?

We also have a giant Ski Sculpture made from tyres, how can we best utilised this in the summer? We want to talk to females also, how would we do this in a non-intrusive environment? Promoting safety is key through all of this, what are the approaches we could take?

THE PROCESS

After an initial briefing meeting with Key Parker on the Bridgestone brand, the company philosophy, position within the market and the key company values the challenges were shared with the Future Media team. These challenges were formulated into a brief and the work started.

Desk based research around the competitors, the consumers and the products took place whilst at the same time research into the market from a digital perspective was undertaken too.

Armed with this information the Future Media team began to look at solutions and platforms that could deliver on the brief for Bridgestone.

A ‘tissue session’ was held at Key Parker with there Social Media Manager where the Future Media team shared all the concepts and ideas – some 15 or so! The meeting helped to trim down the ideas to workable solutions, combine certain ideas into campaigns and overall give a temperature check on the direction. The Future Media team was on the right track and hotting up!

With the insight from Key Parker the final ideas were worked up and visualised in to high-resolution images whilst alongside the pitch presentation for Bridgestone’s marketing team was developed. On the pitch day the Future Media team took the Bridgestone team and Key Parker through the history on the project, the ideas to date, the outputs of the ideas, the results that could be expected and ultimately how these ideas would benefit the brand, customers and meet the initial objectives of the brief.

THE OUTPUT

At the end of the pitch the Bridgestone team were very complimentary about the ideas, the thinking, the work that had been put into the concepts and relayed that they felt the background work by the team was also strong.

THE RESULT

The Future Media team have been asked to work with Key Parker to take the ideas to the next level and bring them to life from a design and feasibility point of view. The client’s want to see how everything would work in the context of the real world and how much investment they need to put towards.

The Future Media team will be working closely with Key Parker over the coming weeks and months to not only bring the ideas to life but to execute them and also go to the events and exhibitions where the team’s ideas will be delivered to the trade and public for the first time.

The Future Media Bridgestone Team
The Future Media Bridgestone Team:
Neil Horne, Julia Ivorra Harrison
and Richard Duffy

 

Exciting times for the team lie ahead!

 

Gray Dudek

Senior Lecturer in Digital Communication and Future Media

 

Future Media the New Rules of Digital Communication

At the heart of the Future Media course is a planning methodology that belongs to one of the world’s most successful advertising agencies. That methodology is a five-step process, developed by McCann Digital and it forms a sequential workflow that covers almost every consideration in a digital communications project.

The five steps cover: Discovery, Planning, Design, Development and Deployment (DPDDD)

DPDDD Methodology blog

In both industry and academic terms, this progression forms a proven model from an authoritative source that demonstrates a logical pathway from concept to conclusion. This route forms the first of the ‘New Rules of Digital Communication’ in this module since it determines every participant’s four-week journey through the pre-production, production and post-production phases of creating their own branded video content, for their own online social media marketing. Put simply, this means making a ‘shareable’ video résume of themselves and their brand.

In the Discovery and Planning phases (week 1) students are given their brief to write, produce and direct their social media videos as well as deliver a formal written report of their progress throughout the project. As part of aligning their learning objectives to their learning outcomes in this module, students also receive in-depth lectures and seminars on the branding principals, creative approaches, technical specifications and multiplatform strategies essential to the final delivery of a measurably useful and enriching extension to their online profiles.

These sessions, given by industry practitioners, link to previous modules and field trips as well as providing insight and strategy into the actual production process in hand. The overall aim here is to develop a holistic approach to convergent content creation whilst utilizing the DPDDD methodology in practice.

This approach translates into establishing and positioning a brand within a competitive market, developing concepts to carry that brand, identifying targets and effectively delivering messages to and via those targets. This last point is key since the “new rules of digital communication” give online marketers the opportunity to both ‘pull’ audiences ‘in’ to their message (through ‘sticky’, “get it here” exposure on ‘closed’ channels like TV) and ‘push’ audiences ‘out’ with their message (through ‘sharing’, “recommended” exposure on ‘open’ social media channels like YouTube). This is a lucrative and cutting edge arena in today’s predominantly mobile marketing universe; and here, students are exposed to both professional and academically useful research, as well as the experiential practice of creating content that is both ‘sticky’ and ‘shareable’.

As this pre-production phase segues into production, (week 2), students begin to exploit the Design and Development options in the DPDDD methodology. In line with their brief and brand, students’ concepts and messages become visualized in mood-boards and treatments and, in turn, their treatments become scripted into copy and storyboards for peer and target audience feedback.  This process keeps the creative direction of each project on brief whilst at the same time refining their overall strategies and the allocation of resources required to deliver them. Importantly, professional resources and expertise are put in place to maintain the momentum and quality of the creative production process. A commercial image bank and music library is made available to download licensed pictures and compositions for example, and whilst students might source shots from their own archives or shoot material on their iPad minis, there is also the option to shoot ‘links’ in commercial studios with industry camera operators using broadcast quality equipment.

Mike and ShreyasMike and Shrey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is important because high-end production resources require thorough preparation and accurate decision-making, particularly when budgets and schedules are tight. In addition to saving money and time these disciplines also add authority to every stage of the project, especially end-user perceptions, by establishing high production values from the outset.

In the post-production phase of the project, (week 3), all the ‘Design’ and ‘Development’ preparation from the DPDDD model is funnelled into its ‘Deployment’. Here, students corral their carefully selected media into folders for non-linear editing. As an added discipline, they compile these choices into detailed ‘edit scripts’, pinpointing all the precise video and audio clips required to make the completed linear timeline of their production. The ‘edit script’ offers students the chance to make a ‘rough-cut’ of their productions or, more usually, organize all their creative and editorial decision-making before committing to the finite resources of an online edit session in a professional high-end edit suite.

John editing

Neil editing

Working with professional video editors and sound engineers at broadcast facilities, students are allocated a single four-hour slot to cut and mix their completed productions. This practice is, (in addition to their earlier filming with industry camera operators), valuable experience of creative collaboration at a professional level.                        Here, specialist know-how and expertise enhance students’ decision-making as well as adding contextually relevant experiential learning through knowledge transfer amongst all the pressures of an operational environment.

 

 

On completion, the finished productions are saved at high resolution (along with all their associated materials) and then exported in web friendly codecs ready for uploading to targeted destinations. Students may choose, for example, to upload a high-resolution .mov file of their final cut to Vimeo for industry professionals whilst also uploading a lower resolution  .mp4 file of their final cut to wider audiences via Twitter, You Tube, Linked In and Facebook. In all cases, they are ramping up their online presence and exposure as well as consolidating their brand and its proposition. As ‘hits’, ‘likes’ and ‘shares’ build, so too does the amplification of their messages across their target audiences and social networks.  In one case, within hours of upload, a ‘like’ from a student’s ‘first’ Linked In connection (Visiting Tutor) triggered an unprompted ‘like’ from the same student’s target media organization and more specifically, target individual!  Hard evidence for the power of recommended views over browsed views and DPDDD methodology in creating branded content for ‘social video’.

In the final phase of the project, (week 4), students write up their experience in a 3,000 word ‘portfolio of practice’ that combines their academic research and learning in this digital arena with their experiential learning. This is, essentially, a reflective document that serves two functions; it consolidates the DPDDD methodology in ‘real’ and contextually relevant circumstances whilst delivering an industry standard project report as proven preparation for their final module in the Future Media MA and MSc courses: Masters by Practice, where working with industry partners, students deliver an integrated, multiplatform campaign for a commercial brand.

View the Future Media students video resumes.

 

Mike Villiers-Stuart BA, Prof. Cert. TLHPE, FHEA.

Senior Lecturer Future Media and Digital Communications.

 

 

Mark Brill Q and A

1. What are you looking forward to most about the event?

This event is important in helping to address some current, crucial issues in digital media. Above all I’m looking forward to hearing from a really great line up of speakers. Rory Sutherland is always insightful and funny (go and watch his TED talks) and Aurasma are really pushing things forward in Augmented Reality technologies.

2. What particular opportunities in the Digital Revolution excite you the most?

I would say this, but it has to be the rapid uptake of smartphones. Their use is disrupting traditional and other digital media channels. Consumers are accessing brands through smart devices in almost every situation and location. Trends such as showrooming may be seen as a threat, but inevitably it creates some significant opportunities for really innovative, consumer-focussed engagement. The confluence of smartphones, social media and other trends such as Big Data has the potential to create a real meaningful impact on our lives.

3. What is the most unthinkable, unimaginable concept you can think of happening in the future with regards to the industry?

Our view of the future is as much a view of ourselves right now, so it’s hard to say what the unthinkable will be, but let me give it a go… 3D printing means that products become free. Think how the internet and has made information and much of our media largely free.Then imagine what will happen when 3D printers can work with almost any material and are cheap enough to have in your home. Printing your own spare parts for your washing machine or your car are obvious applications. It will be simple to do, as 3D files for just about every object will be distributed on the internet, for free of course. But what if you could also print food or clothes or even spare body parts? There is already a machine that prints with chocolate. Products will loose their value as objects and will essentially become free. That will have a massive, disruptive impact for many brands, particularly product brands. Old product brands will need to re-invent themselves and there will be new kinds of businesses to service our needs.

4. If you could have one super power to sort out all the problems you see, what would it be and how would you use it?

My superpower would be Photoshop. That’s real life Photoshop. If I had a rough night, I could use a bit of gaussian blur to smooth my eyes over in the morning, or add a tan. That’s a pretty obvious use, and women of course have make up that does that kind of job. I’d also like to be able to use my Photoshop superpower everywhere. The day’s looking a bit overcast? I’ll just paint in a blue sky. Better still, if I’m in the pub and there’s an annoying bloke opposite, I’ll just use the magic wand tool to select him and delete him form the picture.

Future Trends – Mark Brill, Lead Partner & Lecturer, Brand Emotivity & Future Media

Our very own Mark Brill will be closing the event with his talk on Future Trends. This will not only be the chance for Mark to share his knowledge and expertise into what the future holds for our industry, but also to share with people what the Future Media team do! Mark has worked in Digital Media since 1992 and Mobile Media since 2003. He works in Mobile strategy and innovation with brands and is also the Chair of the Direct Marketing Associations Mobile Council. Mark is also a Senior Lecturer at Birmingham City University, where he is teaching all of us Future Media students about the industry we are about to embark on.  This session is also an opportunity for Mark to promote the course, what we are doing and how we are learning the jobs that don’t exist yet! Maybe we are being biased, but this could perhaps be the highlight of the event!

To Follow on Twitter @marktxt4ever

View Mark’s Website Here

View Mark Brill – BCU Future Media Profile

View Mark’s Future Media Q&A Here

View Mark’s LinkedIn Here

 

Agenda

5th December, 2012

9.00am

Chair’s Opening Remarks

Steve Kemish, Managing Director & Chair, IDM Digital Marketing Council, Cyance

9.15am

Sh*t Happens

Justin Pearse, Head of Innovation, Bite Communications, Cyance

9.45am

Change is as Good a Rest

Justin Cooke, Chair, BIMA

Clare McDonald, Founder & MD , Wonderful+Brilliant

Laura Jordan Bambach, Creative Director, DareGeorge Prest, Executive Creative Director, R/GA

10.30am

Adventures in Transmedia Storytelling

Rob Hinchcliffe, Community Strategist , TH_NK

Hilary Perkins, Multiplatform Commissioning Editor, Drama & Film, Channel 4

11.00am

Making Mischief Connect the Content

Ken Robertson, Head of Mischief, Paddy Power

11.45am

Create Curiosity In the Information Age

Ian Cartwright, Director and Co-Founder, elevenfiftyfive

Danny Miller, Co-founder & CEO, Little White Lies

12.00pm

Keeping in Touch with your Human Side

Nick Morris, Founder, Canvas8

12.30pm

Anticipatory Mobile Computing

Mirco Musolesi, Senior Lecturer, University of Birmingham – School of Computer Science

12.45pm

Making Mobile the Star

Matt Mills, Head of Global Partnerships, Aurasma

Kelly Wearmouth, Global Head of Partnerships, Telefonica Digital

1.00pm

Bolt from the Blue

2.30pm

The Revolution will be Homemade

Nick Constantinou, CEO, Collective London

2.45pm

3D Remix Changes Everything

Matthew Plummer-Fernandez, Creative Technologist, Goldsmiths University of London

3.00pm

You’d Better Learn to Like it!

4.00pm

Agile Creativity

Hamish Nicklin, Head of Creative Agency Partnerships, Google

4.15pm

The Innovative Attitude

Dave Birss, Talker, Writer & Doer, GetAdditive.com

4.30pm

When Does the “Unthinkable” Become the Reality?

Jerome Wouters, Senior Product Innovation Manager, Samsung

4.45pm

Celebrating the Power of the Possible:

Melissa Sterry, Director/Head of Technology, Earth 2 Hub

5.15pm

NeuroMarketing:

Rory Sutherland, Vice Chairman, Ogilvy Group UK

5.30pm

2045: Humanity 2.0

Russell Buckley, Man About Town, MobHappy

5.45pm

Future Trends

Mark Brill, Lead Partner & Lecturer, Brand Emotivity & Future Media

6.00pm

Closing Remarks

The Future Media Team!

We will all be at the event and we hope to see you there too!

Richard Duffy. Twitter – @rjjduffy  – Or view his LinkedIn Page

Julia Ivorra Harrison. Twitter – @julsivo  – Or view her LinkedIn Page

Shreyas Joshi. Twitter – @AdMadChey  – Or view his LinkedIn Page

Neil Horne. Twitter – @juva1 – Or view his LinkedIn Page

John Seedhouse. Twitter – @leftlung  – Or view his LinkedIn Page

 

For more information about the course we are on, click on the image below

 

The Event

4 Minute Warning – Your Chance to Think the Unthinkable

The event focuses on how the digital revolution is transforming the industry. With many new technologies and channels available now, new avenues are being explored in order to evolve with the times. ‘4 Minute Warning’ will give people the opportunity to discover how we can ‘rethink, redefine and relaunch’ area’s of the industry, and the challenges and possibilities we will face.

Many industry figures will be at the event speaking about their specialties, and discussing on how they will evolve in these times. Expects from the fields of Mobile, Innovation, Design and Creative will all be sharing ideas and insight at the event.

For more information, visit the 4 Minute Warning Website

Click on Image to View Site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Drum

The Drum is a leading resource for Advertising, Design, Media, Marketing, Digital, Social Media and PR. They provide information on current events, new advertisement’s and jobs in the industry. They organise many flagship awards including The Drum Design Awards, The Chip Shop Awards, Goldentwits and many others. They also provide events such as 4 Minute Warning, and provide up to date news, analysis and opinions on the world of marketing.

For more information, visit www.thedrum.com and follow on Twitter @TheDrum