Celebrating National Libraries Week 2018: Can a book exchange improve mental health?

 

The theme for Libraries Week, 8–13 October is wellbeing, providing libraries with a chance to celebrate how they are supporting their community.

At the Mary Seacole Library, City South Campus, there is a great initiative running, a Book Exchange. Resources and a space for reading for pleasure have been provided. A chat with the Library Advisor working on this project outlined how the Exchange is set-up, how it can support students and staff to take time out of their busy lives, to relax, and in so doing improve their mental health through the simple act of reading.

What is the Book Exchange?

“It is a collection of fiction and non-fiction books that have been donated by staff and students who no longer want them but really want to share the pleasure of reading with others. Library colleagues set it up and I now have the pleasure of taking it on.”

Where is the Book Exchange?

“You can find it on the right hand side, immediately on entering through the Mary Seacole Library security gates. It has recently been relocated to this position to ensure more people see it, and get to enjoy the collection. Over the summer the books have been reorganised by genre and the collection was expanded.”

How can reading help with people’s mental wellbeing?

“It has been shown that reading can provide relaxation, motivation to learn, knowledge of other cultures, improvements in self-esteem, reduce symptoms of depression, increase empathy, improve communication and also help with creativity and imagination.”

The types of books in the Book Exchange?

“All sorts. Romantic fiction, historical fiction, crime, mystery, thriller, assorted popular fiction…lots.”

If I want to borrow a book from the Exchange what do I need to do?

“Just take a book off the Book Exchange shelves if you fancy it. You don’t need your borrower card. Just take it away. When you finish with it simply hand it in at the Library Helpdesk or place it on the Book Exchange shelves and staff will sort them.”

Can anyone donate books they’ve finished with?

“Absolutely. All books are welcomed. Just bring them to the Help Desk in the library or pop them on the Book Exchange shelves.”

What are your hopes this year for the Book Exchange?

“For students I really hope taking time away from studying, (where possible), to read a book on a completely different subject, will help to benefit their mental health and wellbeing in general. A lovely bit of down time.”

BookEx1Sept18

So, if you want to relax, get back in to reading, or maybe be adventurous and try a new genre, then come on down to City South. Grab a free book today and take yourself off to a different world for a little while…. Happy reading! Happy improved wellbeing!

Check out the Reading Agency too for more information about reading well for mental health.

^Posted on behalf of Fid Bleasdale, Library Advisor

Don’t just eat your GREENS, work amongst them too!

arboretum-174916_640

We have all heard about the health benefits of green leafy vegetables on our bodies but did you also know that surrounding yourself around green leafy plants can also have health benefits on our bodies too? Numerous scientific studies have shown that just adding some green indoor plants to a workplace environment can bring major positive benefits to workers. Maybe we should consider adding some green indoor plants to our workspace at BCU.

 Here are the top five benefits that ‘Greening Up’ indoor workspaces can bring:

  1. They can decrease stress. The colour green is believed to have a relaxing and calming effect on humans, which can help bring down work related tension, anxiety, anger and hostilities, which all helps to lift workers’ spirits and makes a happy working environment for everyone. https://www.verywellmind.com/color-psychology-green-2795817

Continue reading

BCU Harvard Style in EndNote

Library staff have worked with colleagues in IT, Centre for Academic Success and staff at Clarivate Analytics to add the BCU Harvard Style to EndNote reference management software.

This means students and staff can now select BCU Harvard as an output style from within the desktop and web versions of EndNote. An EndNote plugin for word processing software will then allow users to produce reference lists and bibliographies automatically in the format used by the University.

If you want further information about BCU’s referencing guidelines visit here.

If you want training on how to use EndNote Web, IT offer workshops, check out their schedule for further details.

 

 

How to…contact the library

 

Library Help

We are running our How to events next week.

Library staff will be visiting all 5 of our campus libraries to show you how to get help from the library and the various different ways to contact us.

The timetable for the sessions is below:

Date Location Time
Mon 5 March School of Art Library,

Margaret Street

11:30 to 12:30
Tue 6 March Curzon Library 11:30 to 12:30
Wed 7 March Kenrick Library 11:30 to 12:30
Thu 8 March School of Jewellery Library, Vittoria Street 10:00 to 11:00
Fri 9 March Mary Seacole Library 11:30 to 12:30

Hope to see you there!

^Posted on behalf of Huizhe Jin and Janet Fox, Customer Services.

Make more of our library resources

Do you want to discover more about how to use library resources, services and databases?

find resources

Then sign up to one of our drop-in sessions where you can:

  • Get hands-on experience of using our databases eg. CINAHL; MEDLINE: Cochrane: PSYCHArticles; SPORTSDiscus; Summon
  • Learn how to get the most out of the databases
  • Improve your search skills and techniques to get better results

Sessions take place in Seacole 271, and are running from now until April.

Simply book your place via moodle (Open Sessions at City South) 

^Posted on behalf of the Learning, Teaching & Research Team, Seacole Library