We need you… Part 2

Graduate PlusLLR

We need students to take part in some focus groups to help us understand your perspective on navigating around our systems to access library resources.

You would be required to attend two sessions, one in May this academic year, and one next academic year in the Spring term.

Each session lasts 2 hours and involves

  1. Scenario based activities to enable us to detail your experiences of accessing library resources. We will assess your customer journey in terms of ease, quality and emotional response.
  2. Focus group discussion

We value your input because understanding your perspectives and hearing ‘your’ voice are essential to the development of our processes and services.

The dates for Session 1 are:

Tuesday 2nd May 1.30pm – 2.30pm

Thursday 4th May 10am – 12noon

Tuesday 9th May 1pm – 3pm

If you are interested in participating please email llrservicedevelopment@bcu.ac.uk 

Participation counts towards your Silver award.

^This was posted on behalf of BCU Graduate+ and Library and Learning Resources.

We need you… Part 1

Graduate PlusLLR

We are looking for as many 1st and 2nd year BCU students as possible to take part in our online survey.

The survey involves completing a scenario based question around finding library resources via our library systems.

We value your input because understanding your perspectives and hearing ‘your’ voice are essential to the development of our processes and services.

If you are interested in participating please email ebase@bcu.ac.uk

Participation counts towards your Bronze award.

 

^This was posted on behalf of BCU Graduate+ and Library and Learning Resources.

“Wave Goodbye” – Conservatoire Library Stories Part 5

The Birmingham Conservatoire Library closes its doors for the last time on Friday 9th June 2017.

Today we continue with the history of the library

1970s onwards

One of the first discussions that took place when the Birmingham School of Music became part of the then-Birmingham Polytechnic, was the facilities and borrowing arrangements in the new Paradise Circus location. Sue Clegg was the first music Librarian appointed in the new library, and she quickly organised the stock properly for the first time – filling in the gaps where there were omissions, cataloguing the collection so that it could be searched, and forging links with the Birmingham Central Library, Birmingham University Music Library, and the CBSO.

£1000 was given to the library for purchase of TV and video equipment, and the library was also instructed to make provision for the growing interest in the study of electronic music. In 1978 Sue Clegg also appealed for more money to cover growing binding costs, as well purchase of cassettes, and new vocal and orchestral sets.

In 1981, the library finally got a security system to stop stock loss – this included Tattletape and security gates. Recommendations were also made this year to expand the library, as in the years since the move to Paradise Circus, the space had already been outgrown and had been considered insufficient by the CNAA who validated the degree courses. The library was extended in 1983.

MU retro 5

MU retro 6

In the Centenary souvenir programme (1986), then Librarian Stella Thebridge wrote:

The library today would amaze not only those students of 50 or 100 years ago, but also those who studied here only 20 years ago. Those who would have been pleased to trace a piece of music in a card catalogue will find computerised catalogues giving details of holdings not only of this library but of 50 others round the country. The student who would have welcomed the opportunity to hear a record in the library can now switch from an opera on video, via a traditional cassette or record to the pure strains of a compact disc. History is constantly around us at the School of Music library. Music does not date, and it is thrilling to open a piece and find a signature flourished by Granville Bantock, a dedication by Liszt or Holst or a performance direction noted by Harold Gray to be passed on to the CBSO

MU retro 1

Our history of the Conservatoire Library continues in two weeks.

Our thanks to John Smith who provided the above information via extracts from the School of Music Committee notes and Fanfare Magazine.

Subscribe using the link on the right to receive regular news and stories from Library and Learning Resources.

New Service! 24/7 Live Chat

We’re really pleased to announce that we’re now able to chat to you online, 24/7!

We’ve been running our live chat service for a number of years in-house, during the day in term time. Now, we’ve joined a team of international libraries to allow you to talk to a qualified librarian at any time that suits you. We’ll still be logging on, but when we’re not online your question will be answered by a librarian at a partner institution. We’re all committed to giving excellent customer service and making sure you get the help you need.

libanswers new V2

You can click the ‘Ask Us’ button on the left to chat to us, or the ‘Email us’ link on the right to send us an email message. You can also text, Tweet, Facebook, phone, or pop in and speak to us!

We really hope you enjoy this service. Please send us a message if you have any feedback or questions.

^Laura

“Wave Goodbye” – Conservatoire Library Stories Part 4

The Birmingham Conservatoire Library closes its doors for the last time on Friday 9th June 2017.

Today we continue with the history of the library.

1950s onwards

The library continued to grow, with plenty of donations and purchases over the years, as well as some disputes over the ownership of various valuable works discovered in the basement!

In 1955, the Committee was asked for advice on the running of the gramophone section of the Library at Margaret Street, particularly recommendations for purchasing new records. After investigation it was found that the Margaret Street librarian was doing a very efficient job already, and the library was already moving to purchase better-quality LP records. It was considered whether the gramophone library should merge with the music library, but for practical reasons this idea was postponed. In 1957, this decision was questioned by the new Principal, who thought the library at Margaret Street would benefit music students. As well as recommending that music students be able to use Margaret Street library, which they would later be allowed to do, he also wanted to transfer some of the stock to the music library and enlarge the space to accommodate both this and a new reading room. Books that were transferred between the two buildings were labelled as such and interfiled. In 1958 four very rare orchestral works were discovered at Margaret Street, bound into one volume and miscatalogued. They were separated and sold on, after the Birmingham Public Library scanned them and retained the negatives for their collection.

In 1956, it was reported that many of the orchestral works, now dating back to the 1920s, were beginning to disintegrate. A method of heatsealing the works was investigated, but a final decision was made to purchase plastic folders instead. Also agreed for purchase that year was a specialist gramophone record player, which was to be installed by a technical expert at a cost of £100!

The 1960s began with a change to the Margaret Street arrangements. Rather than individual students paying £1/year to use the library, the Birmingham School of Music (BSM) payed an annual subscription of 10 guineas. The Principal, Gordon Clinton, also wrote a paper on the future of the relationship between the BSM and the Birmingham Midland Institute (BMI) where it was housed asserting that the music library should merge with the BMI library, as long as the School Librarian remain in control of the music.

Big changes happened in the early 1960s, with the BSM gaining independence from the BMI in 1963. It was housed in temporary premises from 1965, however the offer made from the LEA for the library was not considered adequate. Instead, the BMI loaned textbooks and orchestral items to the BSM, pending a revised offer. The situation was poor for music students, who were unable to borrow from the BMI library, and therefore struggled to access the parts they required. Negotiations continued, and concerns were raised that whilst certain items were in storage, they were beginning to deteriorate. A few years after the split, the BSM purchased the library, minus some of the valuable works, for £2500 and this was moved to Dale End in 1966.

In 1970, the BSM became part of Birmingham Polytechnic, although it retained its Conservatoire status.

Our history of the Conservatoire Library continues in two weeks.

Our thanks to John Smith who provided the above information via extracts from the School of Music Committee notes and Fanfare Magazine.

Subscribe using the link on the right to receive regular news and stories from Library and Learning Resources.