Tag Archives: Local Authority

Pupil Premium, Academisation and Governance

Written by Dr. Rob Smith, Reader in Education, @R0b5m1th

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Rob spoke on Radio WM during Adrian Goldberg’s show on the 30th March 2016 8am about pupil premium in the light of recent Perry Beeches. BBC WM

The pupil premium policy provides an example of tensions that are at the heart of English education policy at the moment. To start with there are the market structures of competition between different schools. With this marketisation comes a centralised model of governance through data (see for example, Ozga 20
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). Schools are required to produce data so that their “pData1erformance” in relation to other schools can be compared. As we know, the consequences of this emphasis on performance data include a narrowing of the curriculum consequent on teaching to the test and the gaming of data. The problem with marketisation is that we may expect schools to be run public-mindedly, in the spirit of meeting all students’ needs, with a public service ethic, but the landscape in which they operate forces them to focus their efforts on being a viable financial institution with a staff drilled in the production of favourable performance data.

The academisation of all schools by 2020 is a further consolidation of the same policy of marketisation. The principle underlying this is that competition “is the rising tide that lifts all boats” (Willetts) – in other words the unfounded notion that competition is a like a force of nature that raises standards in every institution. In my view, this is a wildly one-sided view of the impact of marketisation. But it is important to note that academisation facilitates a more direct funding relationship between schools and central government.

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Within this marketised policyscape, the pupil premium policy is a redistributive policy that acknowledges the link between household income and educational attainment (see Lupton and Thomson 2015, here). In other words, the pupil premium policy is designed to address social justice in education. Pupil Premium is an amount of money (around £1000 per student p.a. in secondary) that is paid to schools based on census data they gather about the househoMeasuring1ld income of individual students’ families. The implication is clear: schools with additional financial resources are in a better position to meet the needs of those students and in so doing to address the inequality in attainment that currently seems to exist.

Now here’s the tension:

What happens when a policy that seeks to tackle social injustice is nested within an overall cultural environment of institutional self-interest?

In the last few weeks, we may have been provided with some answers in the Perry Beeches saga.

Perry Beeches was a shining example of the success of Free School and academisation policies. The principle underlying these policies are that academy chains provide a better template for raising student attainment and that local authority governance of schools needs to end. The performance of Perry Beeches 1 and 2 appeared to provide evidence for this claim. It was only with the poor inspection result of Perry Beeches 3 last summer that the success story started to unravel. This was followed in October 2015, by allegations to the Education Funding Agency (EFA) that Perry Beeches the Academy (Perry Beeches 1) “had recorded pupils on the annual census entitled to receive FSM where no entitlement existed” (EFA 2016, 3). This resulted in an investigation and a report.

I think the report speaks for itself. But I think it should also be read in conjunction with the Ofsted report for Perry Beeches 2 that took place in April 2014. In this report the school was deemed outstanding for leadership and management. Pupil premium was mentioned specifically:

“Over half the students are eligible for the pupil premium, which is well above average. This is additional funding for students known to be eligible for free school meals, those in local authority care and any with a parent in the armed services.”

Furthermore, governance was praised in this area:

Governors ensure pupil premium funding is used effectively to provide additional teaching and support staff, for intervention and enrichment support for the students for whom the funding is received.

Since then, the Chief Executive of the Perry Beeches Academy has resigned from his post but intends to continue as a head teacher. The academy chain is to be taken over by another academy chain. The failings of OFSTED to do anything other than affirm the school as a shining example and early adopter of the government’s academisation policy needs to receive greater attention.Measuring2

As for Pupil Premium, the episode provides yet another example of the worrying effects of the colonisation of educational cultures by a market mentality that is championed by the current government. While bowing to the forces of colonisation may secure funds for schools in the short term, this can lead to a distortion of the truth of the kind we are familiar with in commercial culture.

That can not provide a sound foundation on which to construct a world class education system.

Pupils as Partners CPD Pilot

Written by Amanda French, Senior Researcher, School of Eduction

The CPD landscape is changing across health and education. There has been a decrease in Local authority provision, the growth of Academies and Free Schools and the demise of the Local Authority in health and educational community provision means there has been a growth in private companies and training consultants offering CPD in health and education. Against the background of austerity cuts community groups, charities, schools and colleges are increasingly looking to third stream funding provide extracurricular opportunities for their pupils/students, especially in areas of social-economic deprivation where arguably the need for enrichment activities is greatest. Responding to the fact that, schools, colleges and voluntary bodies have not traditionally been offered CPD in these areas, this pilot CPD, funded by HELS, reflects the Faculty’s commitment to community-based education and development.rb1901_BusinessSchoolstock

The project team are based in the Centre for Studies in Culture and Practice in Education (CSCPE).   We are drawing  our belief that children should be at the centre of any bid writing and research that involves them.  However, organisations seeking external funding have not traditionally sought to include children and young adults as vital participants in the bid-writing process. Rather, too often children and young adults are perceived solely as recipients of successful bid writing and even where they may be involved in putting a proposal together they are not engaged in any aspect of  subsequent project management and  evaluation processes.

In contrast, the Pupils and Partners project will deliver participating organisations an intensive, interactive workshop in bid writing and research which encourages pupils to become self-determining and effective co-bid writers alongside their teachers.

It is hoped that this pilot will form a sound basis for the commercial launch of community-based CPD package on bid writing, project management and evaluation. In this way HELS will be developing interactive and partnership-centered capacity building for schools and organisations working with children in our wider community.