Tag Archives: cultural entrepreneur

Podcast Series: The Rise of the Cultural Entrepreneur

This series of podcasts about my book, Cultural Entrepreneurship, are in French and English. They were produced in conversation with my colleagues Dr Karen Patel (English version) and Professor Paul Long (French version).

In this podcast, The Rise of the Cultural Entrepreneur, I explore who is a cultural entrepreneur and how we might compare or contrast them to entrepreneurs. I mention scholars who take a critical view of entrepreneurship in the creative industries and I introduce the idea of ‘becoming’ a cultural entrepreneur.

The Rise of the Cultural Entrepreneur – in English

The Rise of the Cultural Entrepreneur – in French

Cultural Entrepreneurship Podcast Series: In Conversation with Daniella Genas-Ogunbanjo

In this podcast, I discuss my new book Cultural Entrepreneurship: The Cultural Worker’s Experience of Entrepreneurship with entrepreneur and business consultant Daniella Genas-Ogunbanjo.

Daniella is a multi award winning entrepreneur, experienced business consultant and advocate for women in business. A former student from BCU’s School of Media, Daniella was alumni of the year in 2012, when she was running her event management business and a social enterprise, Aspire4U.

Listen to our conversation below:

Post-feminism, Cultural Entrepreneurship and Social Media

FeministWith my colleague Karen Patel, I am writing a paper which seeks to address issues of identity and professionalism for female cultural entrepreneurs by drawing on the online activities of a small group of women. We are investigating the construction of professional identities as expressed through social media activities, in this case we focus on twitter as a key platform for cultural workers.

One of the contradictions in women’s contemporary experience is a level freedom and empowerment co-existing with inequalities. This is described by Angela McRobbie (2004) as an entanglement of feminist and anti-feminist ideas illustrated by celebrities such as Karen Brady and Sheryl Sandberg who merge a feminist discourse of empowerment with neoliberal values (Gill and Scharff, 2011). In particular, entrepreneurial activities tend to appropriate a ‘can do’ language which puts an emphasis on individualism and  agency as a driving force for personal development. Of concern to scholars such as McRobbie, Gill and Scharff is the pervasiveness of a neoliberal agenda on personal identity and notions of subjectivity as individuals become preoccupied with self-image to demonstrate qualities such as expertise and professionalism. Continue reading Post-feminism, Cultural Entrepreneurship and Social Media

Female Digital Entrepreneur

Motherhood and setting up digital enterprise – what are the challenges?

In a recent blog post, Dr Angela Martinez goes beyond the over-optimistic rhetoric usually associated with entrepreneurship and highlights The Reality of the Female Digital Entrepreneurs.   She states:

…the overwhelming conclusion of research into self employment by women, particularly mothers, is that it is more likely to intensify activity in both work and family spheres rather than resolve the tensions between the two.

Continue reading Female Digital Entrepreneur

Cultural Entrepreneurs: Identity and Becoming a Cultural Entrepreneur

We had a fascinating discussion yesterday, Wednesday 11th February, at the weekly BCMCR research seminar.  First,  Dr Christina Scharff  presented her research project ‘Young, female and entrepreneurial?

Exploring the working lives of young women in the classical music profession’ addresses various timely issues, such as the racial, classed and gendered inequalities that characterise the classical music profession, the gendered politics of self-promotion, as well as the psychic life of neoliberalism and the subjective experiences of precarious work.

I followed Christina with my own research based on an aspect of my PhD thesis, ‘Identity and becoming a cultural entrepreneur’. My paper explores the idea of ‘rethinking cultural entrepreneurship’ by focusing on the cultural entrepreneurs’ sense of themselves. Their personal identities based on their subjective experience of being an entrepreneurial cultural worker. As this is not a fixed identity, I propose the idea of becoming a cultural entrepreneur, in an environment in which individuals negotiate their version of the entrepreneurial cultural worker. In my presentation, I argue that cultural entrepreneurs perform the identity of the cultural entrepreneur, either by making use of popular stereotypes or by counteracting them, and that they are not puppets, passively accepting dominant attitudes and behaviours associated with entrepreneurship or with cultural work. Rather, cultural entrepreneurs are reflexive and negotiate their identity to suit their personal narrative, within a relational context. Here are the presentation slides:

Becoming a Cultural Entrepreneur

Not everyone wants to be an entrepreneur

In a recent article, The End of Quiet Music, Alina Simone discusses her concerns with having to be entrepreneurial and ‘selling’ her music. Simone says:

 I was a singer, not a saleswoman. Not everyone wants to be an entrepreneur.

I dont agree with everything Simone suggests. For example, I have some concerns with the idea that patronage is the answer or that musicians can be supported by governments or other public institutions. However, I do have sympathy with the idea that not everyone is comfortable with being an entrepreneur. In fact, I come across this quite often. The sense that some, not all, individuals working within the creative and media industries will have to be entrepreneurial to get on, but are relunctance to fully embrace entrepreneurship.

Entrepreneurial practices require high levels of personal investment and as Angela McRobbie argues, it can lead to self-exploitation. Blaming yourself if things go wrong and working hard for little financial reward; for ‘the love of it’.

 There is nothing wrong with being enterprising but the overwhelming positivity associated with enterpreneurs and entrepreneurship can provoke uneasiness. It is something we actively discuss on the MA Media and Creative Enterprise. The challenges and risks are too often gloosed over. I hope this becomes part of the discussion for the Centre for Entrepreneurs who are currently investigating the media view of entrepreneurship.