RE:Present Symposium: Cultural Leadership & Diversity

96d82392353416abda2e135d3e625e27-jpg-500x300Since March 2016 I have been involved in the evaluation of the RE:Present programme, a new initiative aimed at emergent and established cultural leaders/ producers and artist/leaders from diverse backgrounds who are currently underrepresented in Birmingham.  Continue reading RE:Present Symposium: Cultural Leadership & Diversity

Diversity and Cultural Leadership

As part of my role as a researcher at Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Studies, I was recently invited to evaluate Re:Present, a new programme of activities which seeks to transform the diversity of Birmingham’s cultural leadership. As researcher / evaluator my focus will be twofold: the individual participants’ experience and the significance of the programme in relation to Birmingham’s cultural ecology.

Created and delivered by Helga Henry of Creative Shift and Lara Ratnaraja, Re:Present is funded by Birmingham City Council and Arts Council England, with the additional support of University of Birmingham, Birmingham City University and Aston Business School. But Re:Present is also best described as a very personal project for Lara and Helga. Having worked with Birmingham’s cultural industries for over 15 years, they have witnessed significant changes in the cultural landscape during that period of time. Re:Present was created in response to their concerns and what they perceive as a lack of opportunities for individuals from ‘diverse’ backgrounds. I will explore the idea of ‘diversity’ in future posts but for this first blog post, I describe the context for this initiative. Continue reading Diversity and Cultural Leadership

Post-feminism, Cultural Entrepreneurship and Social Media

FeministWith my colleague Karen Patel, I am writing a paper which seeks to address issues of identity and professionalism for female cultural entrepreneurs by drawing on the online activities of a small group of women. We are investigating the construction of professional identities as expressed through social media activities, in this case we focus on twitter as a key platform for cultural workers.

One of the contradictions in women’s contemporary experience is a level freedom and empowerment co-existing with inequalities. This is described by Angela McRobbie (2004) as an entanglement of feminist and anti-feminist ideas illustrated by celebrities such as Karen Brady and Sheryl Sandberg who merge a feminist discourse of empowerment with neoliberal values (Gill and Scharff, 2011). In particular, entrepreneurial activities tend to appropriate a ‘can do’ language which puts an emphasis on individualism and  agency as a driving force for personal development. Of concern to scholars such as McRobbie, Gill and Scharff is the pervasiveness of a neoliberal agenda on personal identity and notions of subjectivity as individuals become preoccupied with self-image to demonstrate qualities such as expertise and professionalism. Continue reading Post-feminism, Cultural Entrepreneurship and Social Media

Business Model Canvas

Whilst preparing my teaching and reviewing my notes about the Business Model Canvas, I came across this article by Sam Mitchell in Arts Professional, in which he discusses business models and how digital developments can support innovation in arts organizations. The examples he cites include a range of initiatives including accessing new audiences as well as projects supporting cultural workers. At the heart of his argument is the notion that reviewing the business model is key to an arts organization’s sustainability and that digital developments can offer some potential solutions.

But what is a business model? Is it just about finding new ways of making money?

Continue reading Business Model Canvas

What is the Nature of Entrepreneurial Labour in Regional Film Making?

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I recently presented at the New Directions in Film and Television Production Studies 2015 conference as part of a panel presenting research on the topic of Creative Labour.

My paper, entitled ‘The nature of entrepreneurial labour in regional film making’, focused on a small sample of Birmingham film makers and has drawn on my PhD thesis.

My aim was to explore the day-to-day lived experience of entrepreneurial modes of work, identifying individual endeavours and collaborative initiatives, within the context of recent UK cultural and film policies. The space in which film maker’s negotiate personal identities is framed by the local milieu: policies, institutions and individuals. In my research, I find that at a local level, entrepreneurial film makers have a pragmatic approach by contributing to policies and engaging in developing alternative support systems. Structures and relations between individuals help to shape the cultural milieu for entrepreneurial cultural work, but this is a fluid space in which individual film makers negotiate diverse priorities and values.

Continue reading What is the Nature of Entrepreneurial Labour in Regional Film Making?

Female Digital Entrepreneur

Motherhood and setting up digital enterprise – what are the challenges?

In a recent blog post, Dr Angela Martinez goes beyond the over-optimistic rhetoric usually associated with entrepreneurship and highlights The Reality of the Female Digital Entrepreneurs.   She states:

…the overwhelming conclusion of research into self employment by women, particularly mothers, is that it is more likely to intensify activity in both work and family spheres rather than resolve the tensions between the two.

Continue reading Female Digital Entrepreneur

Media and Cultural Work: A Resource for Better Working Life in the Arts and Media

This new website, Media and Cultural Work, is targeted at those working in the media and cultural industries, as practitioners, activists, policy makers, campaigners, students and academics.

Devised by David Hesmondhalgh and Kate Oakley, at the School of Media and Communication, University of Leeds, the aim of the website is to create an international forum to address a range of  issues in the sector, including inequalities (gender and ethnic) and the precarious nature of cultural work.

The appeal of working in the media and cultural industries has never been higher. Many young people want to enter these industries and many workers tolerate low pay and poor working conditions to stay within them. But better working conditions and an end to exploitative forms of unpaid work are vital if we want more open and diverse media and cultural industries.

The resource can be followed on Twitter: @mediaculturwork